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-   -   Costco Bikes (http://www.outdoorsmenforum.ca/showthread.php?t=377985)

Trochu 03-13-2020 09:03 AM

Costco Bikes
 
My wife has wanted me to by a bicycle for a few years now. As the kids are getting older and can actually ride for more than half a block before getting tired/bored/hurt, this may be the year I commit. The problem being, I'm not a bike guy and basically know nothing about the specifics. Are the Northrock bikes at Costco any good, or decent value for the money?
https://images.costco-static.com/Ima...recipeName=680

They look decent, listed at $450.00. I just have no idea if a "KMC-Z50" chain for example, is any good.

Here is the link: https://www.costco.ca/northrock-xc27...100517769.html

I'm not getting a bike and headed straight to Canmore, this will probably be used on paths and the road almost entirely. Offroad would likely entail going off the curb.

mooseknuckle 03-13-2020 09:05 AM

I've ridden one, they are a great bike for the money!! And for casual riding like you have planned.... this bike will work great in my opinion.

owlhoot 03-13-2020 09:27 AM

Well it has disc brakes, aluminum frame and front shocks. I'm not familiar with the shifters but it looks like a good bike for the price. 32 lbs isn't light but fine for your needs

HalfBreed 03-13-2020 09:30 AM

If you go this route, ride it in the parking lot before leaving.

Nothing sucks worse than a minor wheel bend or some such that can't be detected in the store aisle.

These are assembled by their employees.

MK2750 03-13-2020 09:36 AM

The drive train and components are a very slight upgrade over most bikes in that price range and a big upgrade over some of the big box junk.

The problems you might run into is a quality control things and a lack of customer service. Assembly and set up is fairly straight forward for me being a licensed mechanic and probably anyone else mechanically inclined with good reading skills. After setting up lots of them and meeting people on the trail, I realize that most should leave tune ups to bike techies.

So, after you change that seat (you will find out later) and pay someone to set it up (if you don't get frustrated and toss the whole thing), you might be better served buying from an actual bike stop. You will get exactly what you want, a better quality bike, professional set up and after purchase support. ( this of course if you choose the right shop)

If you are mechanically inclined I would look at used bikes. Spend some time reading the forums and call around. That community is very helpful and has forums like this one with every question you can think of already answered. People into bikes are upgrading constantly so if you educate yourself you can get in to twice or even three times the bike for the same money.

Lastly, a begiiner mountain bike is like a starter 4X4. If it is used as designed (mountain biking) it will break. Yes the bike you are looking at will work for what you want but there are much better options. In my mid 50s for example I ride a mid level Giant hybred/trainer. It allows me to sit more upright putting less strain on my back and is much faster than a mountain bike. It rides much smoother on the trails you describe and is 100 times more fun to drive on those trails. It is over 4 times your budget new but I picked mine up for just slightly over your budget in perfect condition.

riden 03-13-2020 09:59 AM

If I were buying a bike in that price range, I would take a really hard look at this before Costco. One huge advantage that was mentioned is, it will be tuned perfectly when you buy it and it will be properly sized for you.

https://unitedsport.ca/collections/b...020-trek-black

These bikes come sized. If you are tall or short, you can often get a great deal on last years model....... yes bike snobs will pay more for this year's model.

EDIT: From the Costco pic, I really don't like the look of the tires. I would prefer smooth rolling and little resistance over a bit of cushion.

I would take good caliper brakes over lower end disc brakes any day. Much easier to adjust, and I suspect cheap disc brakes are really hard to adjust, which you do annually.

riden 03-13-2020 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MK2750 (Post 4126387)

If you are mechanically inclined I would look at used bikes. Spend some time reading the forums and call around. That community is very helpful and has forums like this one with every question you can think of already answered. People into bikes are upgrading constantly so if you educate yourself you can get in to twice or even three times the bike for the same money.

Lastly, a begiiner mountain bike is like a starter 4X4. If it is used as designed (mountain biking) it will break. Yes the bike you are looking at will work for what you want but there are much better options. In my mid 50s for example I ride a mid level Giant hybred/trainer. It allows me to sit more upright putting less strain on my back and is much faster than a mountain bike. It rides much smoother on the trails you describe and is 100 times more fun to drive on those trails. It is over 4 times your budget new but I picked mine up for just slightly over your budget in perfect condition.

All good advice.

calgarychef 03-13-2020 10:19 AM

I bought a bike at Costco some 20 years ago. Took it in for a tune up last year and the bike shop owner offered me more for it than it cost in the first place.
I like Costco :)

elkhunter11 03-13-2020 10:25 AM

For the use described, that bike would probably work fine, if you purchase the right size, and it is properly adjusted. The better quality bikes are well worth the money if a person rides hard, over rough terrain, the components on the lower priced bikes , won't stand up to hard usage. And I agree on used bikes, many people purchase good quality bikes, ride them a few times, and then they sit unused for years, so if you know what size you need, you can often find great deals.

Au revoir, Gopher 03-13-2020 10:26 AM

"this will probably be used on paths and the road almost entirely. Offroad would likely entail going off the curb. "

In that case, I would say not the right bike. If you aren't going to be riding down dirt trails (and I mean dirt, not nicely maintained gravel trails) don't get a bike with wide knobby tires. All it does is add rolling resistance and reduces traction on pavement. Also, I'm not a fan of front shocks unless you need them, just adds weight and future maintenance issues; problem is, you will have a hard time finding a mountain bike or hybrid without one.

Everything MK2750 said is spot on.

But if you want to go the costco route, maybe look at the Northrock CTM Crossover Bike. I don't know much about the low end Shimano components, but Tourney seems to be par for the course for that price range.

ARG

Nikanit 03-13-2020 10:31 AM

I used to be a former bike messenger and bike mechanic and worked at SYNCROS, that made very high end racing parts. That bike is perfect for a beginner, little pricey, but good. Make sure it's the right size by measuring the down tube, average for men is a 19 inch frame (Mine was a 16.5). What I STRONGLY suggest is getting some anti theft for it from a company called PINHEAD. I had their equipment all over my $3500 Gary Fisher bike that I hand built from frame up. Put locking skewers on your tires as thieves love taking wheels off with those quick releases, and put one on the seat tube. Also, get a motorcycle U-lock. I could leave my bike locked in DT Red Deer and still have it there the next day. Front tires especially are very stealable because quite often it's the front tire that gets bent in screw ups on the road. EVERYONE I know here that has kids, has had bikes stolen, so PLEASE get anti theft deterrents, and make sure the kids treat their bikes with care. Sorry to be so agro with the theft thing, but a new mtn bike is worth quite a bit to a meth head looking for some quick coin.

fishnguy 03-13-2020 10:54 AM

Lots of good advice. I agree with the Gopher guy there in regards to tires and shocks and the bike suggestion.

Nikanit 03-13-2020 11:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Au revoir, Gopher (Post 4126405)
"this will probably be used on paths and the road almost entirely. Offroad would likely entail going off the curb. "

In that case, I would say not the right bike. If you aren't going to be riding down dirt trails (and I mean dirt, not nicely maintained gravel trails) don't get a bike with wide knobby tires. All it does is add rolling resistance and reduces traction on pavement. Also, I'm not a fan of front shocks unless you need them, just adds weight and future maintenance issues; problem is, you will have a hard time finding a mountain bike or hybrid without one.

Everything MK2750 said is spot on.

But if you want to go the costco route, maybe look at the Northrock CTM Crossover Bike. I don't know much about the low end Shimano components, but Tourney seems to be par for the course for that price range.

ARG

Yep...I deliberately didn't put a pair of rox shox on my front end...my buddies all had them because they were really hard core riders... but living in Vancouver, and working in the downtown eastside, it was a must that I kept my bike as neutral looking as possible. I took all stickers off my bike and the parts.

pdog15 03-13-2020 11:59 AM

Bikes
 
I have an older Giant with hybrid tires and have found it very nice for casual riding on the Calgary bike trails. Set the handle bars for more upright riding than the traditional race bike. I think the larger mountain type wheels might be harder to pedal, but have never tried one out.

JB_AOL 03-13-2020 12:18 PM

That bike is perfect for beginners.

My only concern would be the Costco Assembly of the bikes. Just do a bolt check on it, and you should be good to go.

Worst case, return it if you don't like it after a couple rides.

trouter 03-13-2020 12:54 PM

I bought the XC29 a last year. If you google the warranty information, it is the same department as Giant Bikes. Like others have said its an upgrade to dept store bike but the components don't stack up to $1000+ bikes. I researched and test rode a lot of bikes in many shops in Edmonton and i couldn't justify $800-1200 for a bike to ride once or twice a week. I now ride it it every couple days when its warm, and am enjoying our new Bike Park. Only thing I've done is add cell phone mount and new flat pedals. I will upgrade components when they break, so far my $350 bike is standing up to everything I can stand up to.

Sundancefisher 03-13-2020 05:54 PM

City of Calgary bikes.

https://surplus.calgary.ca/Public/De...px?category=24

Big Sky 03-13-2020 07:21 PM

I would be looking at the used market for sure.
A quick look in kijiji shows lots of older hardtails with vg components and owners who claim limited use. Older bikes are hard to sell, but they are often in great shape with motivated sellers. But, you have to know your way around a bike or be willing to put in the time to learn. Park Tools has great instructional vids.

In the Calgary bike sale that was suggested, I'd be looking at that Kona Caldera. The were a great bike with solid components. You never know about the condition, but it could be a real gem.

Example of a kijiji bike that could be awsome. Norco Charger.... $350.
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-mountain-bik...4768?undefined

jbrow397 03-13-2020 08:55 PM

Go to a few bike shops. Ask if they have any $500 or under bikes. Better service and better products. Then look at the $850 to $900 bikes and look for them on kijiji.

Sundancefisher 03-13-2020 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Sky (Post 4126769)
I would be looking at the used market for sure.
A quick look in kijiji shows lots of older hardtails with vg components and owners who claim limited use. Older bikes are hard to sell, but they are often in great shape with motivated sellers. But, you have to know your way around a bike or be willing to put in the time to learn. Park Tools has great instructional vids.

In the Calgary bike sale that was suggested, I'd be looking at that Kona Caldera. The were a great bike with solid components. You never know about the condition, but it could be a real gem.

Example of a kijiji bike that could be awsome. Norco Charger.... $350.
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-mountain-bik...4768?undefined

A lot of stolen bikes on kijiji. Beware.

fred1 03-13-2020 09:55 PM

Looks pretty much like the Northrock fat bike I bought from Costco last spring. When I get onto lose gravel or dirt trails it does have less rolling resistance than my regular mountain bike. I am happy with my purchase. Quality is adequate for my use and I would say the average user.

omega50 03-13-2020 10:25 PM

Leave it to the Dutch

Assemble yourself like something from Ikea
https://sandwichbikes.com/

elkhunter11 03-14-2020 06:54 AM

You can always install smooth tires in place of the knobby tires to reduce rolling resistance on paved trails, if it is a concern, but if part of your reason for riding the bike is exercise, why bother?

Bergerboy 03-14-2020 07:46 AM

Look at the used market. You should easily get a bike that has hydraulic breaks and better components for the price. Since your kids are getting older you may find yourself transitioning from paved trails to dirt. Might as well have the bike that does both.

sewerrat 03-14-2020 08:26 AM

We bought the Infinity hybrid bikes from Costco a few years ago, we actually really like them skinny tires and you sit more straight up up which is very comfortable. These kind of bikes are perfect for the paved trails we have here in the city.
https://www.infinitycycleworks.com/p...s/hybrid-city/

MK2750 03-14-2020 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elkhunter11 (Post 4127031)
You can always install smooth tires in place of the knobby tires to reduce rolling resistance on paved trails, if it is a concern, but if part of your reason for riding the bike is exercise, why bother?

I thought the same thing and over the years picked up several yards sale mountain bikes which would have originated at CT or a like. Cheap seats suck and a new one is only 40 bucks, cheap cables stretch, need constant adjustment or replace +$, cheap brakes, gear sets and tires +$$$ that could have went into a better bike. I looked on Kijiji and you can get a really decent Hybrid for $350 to $500 right now.

Most importantly though is the enjoyment of the riding. I really enjoy my Giant as I only ever tune it ever so slightly once a year along with regular lubrication and it is a blast to drive. I have a 10K route I do across Sylvan every morning in the spring and I look forward to it. If I am not heading out in the bush in the afternoon I will often do the same run after working the dogs. It's enjoyable and I get to see the characters down by the beach :).

A work out on the cheap bikes was more of a chore that often got put off or ended early because the bike needed adjustment or another repair. I now think of a decent bike like a decent pair of boots. The only money wasted was on the cheap ones.

linemanpete 03-14-2020 08:34 AM

I own the bike and quite enjoy it.

elkhunter11 03-14-2020 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MK2750 (Post 4127068)
I thought the same thing and over the years picked up several yards sale mountain bikes which would have originated at CT or a like. Cheap seats suck and a new one is only 40 bucks, cheap cables stretch, need constant adjustment or replace +$, cheap brakes, gear sets and tires +$$$ that could have went into a better bike. I looked on Kijiji and you can get a really decent Hybrid for $350 to $500 right now.

Most importantly though is the enjoyment of the riding. I really enjoy my Giant as I only ever tune it ever so slightly once a year along with regular lubrication and it is a blast to drive. I have a 10K route I do across Sylvan every morning in the spring and I look forward to it. If I am not heading out in the bush in the afternoon I will often do the same run after working the dogs. It's enjoyable and I get to see the characters down by the beach :).

A work out on the cheap bikes was more of a chore that often got put off or ended early because the bike needed adjustment or another repair. I now think of a decent bike like a decent pair of boots. The only money wasted was on the cheap ones.

My point is that you can put smooth tires on any bike, so if you get a great deal on a higher quality used bike, and you want it to roll easier, that is an option. And I do know where you are coming from, cheap rims bend, cheap cables stretch, and in general the cheap components don't last. My last three mountain bikes were higher end bikes by Trek, Kona, and Specialized, and other than changing tires and brake pads, they have been pretty much problem free. I ride mostly the same dirt trail down the valley and out to the range , with some steep hills, and although the full suspension does require more effort to pedal, especially up hills, it is much easier on my back, and much easier to control on higher speed downhills. For the uses the OP mentions though, a rigid frame bike would be lighter, and easier to pedal, at a more affordable price.

Trochu 03-19-2020 04:43 PM

Thanks for the responses guys. I took the advise to look for a similarly priced, but better quality, bike on Kijiji. Picked up a Norco Storm 3 for less than the Costco one once tax was included. It's on the lower end of the "good" bikes, but should more than suit by needs.

^v^Tinda wolf^v^ 03-19-2020 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trochu (Post 4126353)
My wife has wanted me to by a bicycle for a few years now. As the kids are getting older and can actually ride for more than half a block before getting tired/bored/hurt, this may be the year I commit. The problem being, I'm not a bike guy and basically know nothing about the specifics. Are the Northrock bikes at Costco any good, or decent value for the money?
https://images.costco-static.com/Ima...recipeName=680

They look decent, listed at $450.00. I just have no idea if a "KMC-Z50" chain for example, is any good.

Here is the link: https://www.costco.ca/northrock-xc27...100517769.html

I'm not getting a bike and headed straight to Canmore, this will probably be used on paths and the road almost entirely. Offroad would likely entail going off the curb.

My brother has the bike you are looking at and he is very happy with it. I would start with something in this price bracket and see how she goes. Having said that fat bikes arenít for every rider but they get the job done in many aspects. The fat bike takes more leg power to spin the wheels, a bit slower in general and limited in gear settings. The positive of a fat bike is more winter riding and better handling in the rhubarb along with a plush ride. I would also look at a cross country designed platform before deciding whatís best.

The price of bicycles is ridiculous these days and really they are all built the same and with the same materials, the only difference being weight and rolling resistance.


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