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View Poll Results: Would you support the introduction of a bass fishery to Alberta.
Yes 201 52.48%
No 182 47.52%
Voters: 383. You may not vote on this poll

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  #391  
Old 04-18-2011, 12:13 PM
Pudelpointer Pudelpointer is offline
 
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Originally Posted by horsetrader View Post
No you did not miss the sarcasm there was none.and thank you for calling my statement stupid it show me just where your mind set is.What you did miss was where it was discussed a couple time and facts did come out.With out your help. it's good to hear you have a job a family and a life i'm sure 1 or 2 others on this site do to..... What truly amazes me is you had no time or just did not want to be bothered to read the post but you found the time to do the research to try and make a member look like a jerk....Thank you for making this a member friendly site .......
Not my intention at all. You seem to be doing a pretty good job of doing that all on your own. I was simply attempting to keep things "factual" in the argument that is occurring on this thread. Flippant remarks have a tendency to repeated as fact by those with a poor understanding of the complexity of wildlife issues.

FWIW, I was responding to your statement that:

"Originally Posted by horsetrader
90% of the species in alberta are NON-NATIVE the [sic] alberta..."

You did not say "to the waters they are found in, within AB", you said they are NON-NATIVE to Alberta. Braun was kind enough to explain what you meant (possibly) in his brief post. You are choosing to be defensive and sarcastic - not very family friendly, if you ask me.

FYI, the "research" took less time then it took to type my post. Try:

The Fishes of Alberta by Joseph S. Nelson and Martin J. Paetz. The University of Alberta Press. ISBN 0-88864-236-9

The information is on page one of the Introduction.

Happy trolling, I mean fishing.
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  #392  
Old 04-18-2011, 12:29 PM
horsetrader horsetrader is offline
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Originally Posted by Pudelpointer View Post
Not my intention at all. You seem to be doing a pretty good job of doing that all on your own. I was simply attempting to keep things "factual" in the argument that is occurring on this thread. Flippant remarks have a tendency to repeated as fact by those with a poor understanding of the complexity of wildlife issues.

FWIW, I was responding to your statement that:

"Originally Posted by horsetrader
90% of the species in alberta are NON-NATIVE the [sic] alberta..."

You did not say "to the waters they are found in, within AB", you said they are NON-NATIVE to Alberta. Braun was kind enough to explain what you meant (possibly) in his brief post. You are choosing to be defensive and sarcastic - not very family friendly, if you ask me.

FYI, the "research" took less time then it took to type my post. Try:

The Fishes of Alberta by Joseph S. Nelson and Martin J. Paetz. The University of Alberta Press. ISBN 0-88864-236-9

The information is on page one of the Introduction.

Happy trolling, I mean fishing.
I see you are not able to grasp my reply so you just restate your but thats ok I wll not lose any sleep over it. I hope you and your family have a good life.

Cheers..H
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  #393  
Old 04-18-2011, 02:40 PM
Pudelpointer Pudelpointer is offline
 
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A sincere thank you.

Now back to our regular programming...

For those that think that once introduced Bass would stay in the waters they were introduced to, I would like to use a BC example:

Somehow (and it wasn't natural) small mouth bass have ended up in a small chain of lakes that drains into the Quesnel River, arguably one of the more important sockeye producing systems in the Fraser watershed. The nearest known small mouth bass populations are in the Okanagan (IIRC) or the Columbia near Castlegar. Well over 400km as the crow flies.

The bucket brigade is alive and well in North America.
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  #394  
Old 04-18-2011, 04:02 PM
huntsfurfish huntsfurfish is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pudelpointer View Post
A sincere thank you.

For those that think that once introduced Bass would stay in the waters they were introduced to, I would like to use a BC example:

Somehow (and it wasn't natural) small mouth bass have ended up in a small chain of lakes that drains into the Quesnel River, arguably one of the more important sockeye producing systems in the Fraser watershed. The nearest known small mouth bass populations are in the Okanagan (IIRC) or the Columbia near Castlegar. Well over 400km as the crow flies.

The bucket brigade is alive and well in North America.
Must have been birds(just kidding). It seems many still believe that is how fish get overland(Its not). I believe it was mentioned again in this thread. Another example of missinformation.

Thanks for the example Pudelpointer.
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  #395  
Old 04-18-2011, 10:09 PM
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never knew bass were in the Columbia by Castlegar
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  #396  
Old 04-18-2011, 11:58 PM
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Originally Posted by chubbdarter View Post
never knew bass were in the Columbia by Castlegar
Me neither! There are some around Crawford Bay in Kootenay Lake. Maybe they treked through the Kootenay River, got past half a dozen dams and entered the Columbia; but I doubt it.
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  #397  
Old 04-19-2011, 12:10 AM
Mish@ Mish@ is offline
 
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I would only support this if Alberta Environmnet does a good job of preventing the Bass to become Invasive species. It better not happen like it did with the northern Snakehead.
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  #398  
Old 04-19-2011, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by huntsfurfish View Post
Must have been birds(just kidding). It seems many still believe that is how fish get overland(Its not). I believe it was mentioned again in this thread. Another example of missinformation.

Thanks for the example Pudelpointer.
There are still people that buy into the old wives tale that fish are transported by birds.

The only thing you can say to them is that if it really was true...than all water would have all fish species. It was mentioned before on another thread that perch are transported as eggs on the feathers of ducks...yet perch are not everywhere...even after millions and millions of years and millions and millions of ducks and other birds flying all over Alberta.

I discussed with one chap about the logic. He said ducks get eggs stuck in their feathers. Imagine a bird carefully holding some eggs under their wing, in their beak and then taking off gently from a pond...flying carefully not to lose the eggs but fast enough they don't dry out or sophocate then dropping them gently on the lake and in enough numbers to escape predation. Please buy a lottery ticket instead...way better odds.

A study I worked on in the Athabasca drainage showed that only lakes with tributaries to the Athabasca had perch in them. All other lakes had none yet many were side by side.

Simple study proved this theory of bird transportation is baseless.
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  #399  
Old 04-19-2011, 10:52 AM
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Sorry Sun. I gotta wonder how much harder it would be for a bird to transport fish or eggs.

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  #400  
Old 04-19-2011, 01:17 PM
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Sorry Sun. I gotta wonder how much harder it would be for a bird to transport fish or eggs.

lol
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  #401  
Old 04-19-2011, 04:03 PM
pickrel pat pickrel pat is offline
 
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if you look on a map and look how the mighty peace river runs through alberta, its like a barrior for perch.. the only perch on the north side were brought in by the bucket bandits...( cummings lake). what lake has natural perch in it that is on the north side of the river? lots just to the south..... odd....
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  #402  
Old 04-19-2011, 08:42 PM
Pudelpointer Pudelpointer is offline
 
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Originally Posted by tacklerunner View Post
Me neither! There are some around Crawford Bay in Kootenay Lake. Maybe they treked through the Kootenay River, got past half a dozen dams and entered the Columbia; but I doubt it.
The bass in Creston are Large Mouth and the bass a Castlegar are Small Mouth

The small mouths came up from the US Where they are very common in the river
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  #403  
Old 04-20-2011, 02:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Sundancefisher View Post
There are still people that buy into the old wives tale that fish are transported by birds. The only thing you can say to them is that if it really was true...than all water would have all fish species. It was mentioned before on another thread that perch are transported as eggs on the feathers of ducks...yet perch are not everywhere...even after millions and millions of years and millions and millions of ducks and other birds flying all over Alberta.
While I'm certainly not denying the existence of the bucket brigade, all of Alberta except the highest peaks of the Cypress Hills and the Rockies were covered by a couple kilometres of glacial ice until around 10,000 years ago. Somehow after the ice retreated our lakes and rivers became populated by all sorts of fish species, in all sorts of waters. That wasn't done by the bucket brigade, so there is some way that fish can move fairly easily from lake to lake, river to river, and can re-populate a landscape that was under kilometres of ice and devoid of fish to be filled with multiple fish species in most waters, within a fairly short period of time. Birds have to play a role, I can't think what else could do it.
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  #404  
Old 04-20-2011, 04:56 AM
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I somehow missed the last ice age where Hasse and Lake Sundance(just to name a couple) had perch carried into them by the glaciers.
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  #405  
Old 04-20-2011, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by GaryF View Post
I somehow missed the last ice age where Hasse and Lake Sundance(just to name a couple) had perch carried into them by the glaciers.
it was just this winter!!!!! sure felt like it anyways.
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  #406  
Old 04-20-2011, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isopod View Post
While I'm certainly not denying the existence of the bucket brigade, all of Alberta except the highest peaks of the Cypress Hills and the Rockies were covered by a couple kilometres of glacial ice until around 10,000 years ago. Somehow after the ice retreated our lakes and rivers became populated by all sorts of fish species, in all sorts of waters. That wasn't done by the bucket brigade, so there is some way that fish can move fairly easily from lake to lake, river to river, and can re-populate a landscape that was under kilometres of ice and devoid of fish to be filled with multiple fish species in most waters, within a fairly short period of time. Birds have to play a role, I can't think what else could do it.
As the Glaciers retreated, the drainages were different than they are now. Drainages evolved over time but there are still distinct differences in species make up in our current drainage systems... Only grayling south of the Athabasca is in Montana. No sturgeon north of the NSR. Only rainbows in the upper Athabasca...and so on.

Birds did not do it. Access via evolving drainages is the reason.

Cheers

Sun
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  #407  
Old 04-22-2011, 01:25 AM
Crossfire Crossfire is offline
 
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Default Walleye

Dont waste the money on introducing bass as it would be fun to catch some but bass have been introduced before and did not survive because of the climate it would be a huge waste of money i would rather see the money put into increasing the walleye population and stopping netting.
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  #408  
Old 05-26-2011, 11:35 PM
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I'm a huge bass fishing fan, pound for pound I don't think I've ever caught a fish with a better fight than a smallie. That being said, Alberta and all provinces should stick to native species, you never know if bass could run some native fish numbers down by taking over their habitat. Last time I checked the Ringnecked Pheasant took over the Prairie Chickens habitat, I've never seen a Prairie Chicken
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  #409  
Old 05-27-2011, 12:24 AM
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i hate pickerel....stock Bass
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  #410  
Old 05-27-2011, 12:28 AM
horsetrader horsetrader is offline
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Originally Posted by runningarends View Post
I'm a huge bass fishing fan, pound for pound I don't think I've ever caught a fish with a better fight than a smallie. That being said, Alberta and all provinces should stick to native species, you never know if bass could run some native fish numbers down by taking over their habitat. Last time I checked the Ringnecked Pheasant took over the Prairie Chickens habitat, I've never seen a Prairie Chicken
Hmmmmmm Isin't it funny how you get these NEW guys saying BASS in Alberta would be no good........Bet he knows how to speak east coast...Eh bye.....

Just kidding, your opinion and its as good as anyones.

Cheers
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  #411  
Old 05-27-2011, 12:44 AM
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we will need a new breed of law enforcement to protect a Bass fishery

Faster, tougher, a super human being
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  #412  
Old 05-27-2011, 12:48 AM
horsetrader horsetrader is offline
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Originally Posted by chubbdarter View Post
we will need a new breed of law enforcement to protect a Bass fishery

Faster, tougher, a super human being
I'm sure he's here some where he would have to be the BEST there is
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  #413  
Old 07-25-2011, 12:37 AM
Big Daddy Badger Big Daddy Badger is offline
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NO NO NO NO NO...and....NO

They don't belong here.

Lets look at the history of introduced species....

Rats in North America...thats right they weren't here before Europeans brought em.
Starlings...yup some Shakespeare nut got home sick
Broom...that yellow bush you see all over Vancouver Island now.(Another homesick guy from the UK)
Rabbits in Australia
Cane Toads in Australia
Snake heads in the USA
Asian Carp in the USA and the Great Lakes
Wild Boars...that have a bounty on them in Alberta.
Zebra Mussels in the Great Lakes
Asian Long Horn Beetles
Pine Beetles...I think....
Burmese Pythons in the Florida Everglades
European Lady bird beetles...the North American ones are almost all gone now.....shall I go on?

Every one a freakin disaster for native animals.

Why would anyone even suggest we introduce bass when it could really bugger what we have?
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  #414  
Old 07-25-2011, 12:59 AM
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Why not add another one to the list?

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  #415  
Old 07-25-2011, 01:06 AM
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No thanks. I want to fish for bass but unfortunately the bucket brigade will be on full force and probably destroy a bunch of lakes, like the idiots do with yellow perch.
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  #416  
Old 07-25-2011, 01:26 AM
pickrel pat pickrel pat is offline
 
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and were back! lol!
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  #417  
Old 07-25-2011, 08:55 AM
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Bucket brigade meaning the lineup of non licenced non English speaking pouchers covering the shoreline ? Yeah that's not a bass problem , that's an enforcement problem ... You mean dropping fish in other lakes ? Hardly any of the fish in these lakes are native let's stop kidding ourselves it's all reservoirs anyways.....


Bass were introduced in cold lakes that rarely reach 70 so the spawns are thrown off and never succeeded. You can't bucket brigade fish that can't thrive in a cold environment...


I actually think that invermere is killer anyways , all it needs is the smallies to kill off the squawfish and balance the largiess out and you can rest assured no one would be driving to Alberta to fish...they'd be heading to bc , actually not a bad idea in eyes of most of the old farts on here who don't have a clue to what their talking about.....
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  #418  
Old 07-25-2011, 10:32 AM
Mr.goldeye Mr.goldeye is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mszomola View Post
Bucket brigade meaning the lineup of non licenced non English speaking pouchers covering the shoreline ? Yeah that's not a bass problem , that's an enforcement problem ... You mean dropping fish in other lakes ? Hardly any of the fish in these lakes are native let's stop kidding ourselves it's all reservoirs anyways.....


Bass were introduced in cold lakes that rarely reach 70 so the spawns are thrown off and never succeeded. You can't bucket brigade fish that can't thrive in a cold environment...


I actually think that invermere is killer anyways , all it needs is the smallies to kill off the squawfish and balance the largiess out and you can rest assured no one would be driving to Alberta to fish...they'd be heading

to bc , actually not a bad idea in eyes of most of the old farts on here who
don't have a clue to what their talking about.....

bucket brigade meaning normal everyday guys that want to see their favorite species in local lakes. I highly doudt their intentions are bad they just don't think this stuff through. Not all bucket brigade are foreigners either
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  #419  
Old 07-25-2011, 02:15 PM
tarnado tarnado is offline
 
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Originally Posted by pesky672 View Post
NO NO NO NO NO...and....NO

They don't belong here.

Lets look at the history of introduced species....

Rats in North America...thats right they weren't here before Europeans brought em.
Starlings...yup some Shakespeare nut got home sick
Broom...that yellow bush you see all over Vancouver Island now.(Another homesick guy from the UK)
Rabbits in Australia
Cane Toads in Australia
Snake heads in the USA
Asian Carp in the USA and the Great Lakes
Wild Boars...that have a bounty on them in Alberta.
Zebra Mussels in the Great Lakes
Asian Long Horn Beetles
Pine Beetles...I think....
Burmese Pythons in the Florida Everglades
European Lady bird beetles...the North American ones are almost all gone now.....shall I go on?

Every one a freakin disaster for native animals.

Why would anyone even suggest we introduce bass when it could really bugger what we have?

the Mountain Pine Beetle is native
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  #420  
Old 07-25-2011, 02:20 PM
mszomola mszomola is offline
 
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Ticks have now been added , watch out for the bucket brigade i hear theres a phenomenom that has people putting them in your coffee as a joke and say " hey would you like to try it limed ? "
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