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Old 08-22-2017, 03:27 PM
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Timidhc Timidhc is offline
 
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Default Catching MONDOS with MOM!!! | Pike & Perch Fishing Burnstick Lake!

My Mom and I headed out to Burnstick Lake with the hopes of getting her on her first Walleye. Things didn't really work out as planned as the Walleye were nowhere to be found. But thankfully the Perch and Big Pike managed to make the day for us!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3BuRGhBXN0

That was my first time out to Burnstick. And it was a beautiful lake that I can't wait to visit again. Maybe next time i'll find some of those Walleye too!
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:11 PM
NSR Fisher NSR Fisher is offline
 
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Looks like a great time, and if you caught fish you can't really call that a failure.

Also, Walleye are technically part of the perch family so close enough! haha.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:25 PM
Dweb Dweb is offline
 
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Cool shots of them following in right to the boat.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:44 PM
NSR Fisher NSR Fisher is offline
 
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Default red markings on belly / sides

I think those red markings might be a skin infection. Seemed the fish were extra slimy too, and that mucus is probably their skin reacting to the infection.

Make sure to wash your hands haha!

*edit* sterilize your net / de-hooking equipment as well. best stop the spread of that stuff.
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Old 08-22-2017, 11:01 PM
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Timidhc Timidhc is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NSR Fisher View Post
I think those red markings might be a skin infection. Seemed the fish were extra slimy too, and that mucus is probably their skin reacting to the infection.

Make sure to wash your hands haha!

*edit* sterilize your net / de-hooking equipment as well. best stop the spread of that stuff.
Whats the best way to clean your equipment?

Just bleach and water?
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Old 08-23-2017, 10:08 AM
NSR Fisher NSR Fisher is offline
 
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Yeah a bleach solution and warm water should be perfect.
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Old 08-23-2017, 03:08 PM
The Spank The Spank is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NSR Fisher View Post
I think those red markings might be a skin infection. Seemed the fish were extra slimy too, and that mucus is probably their skin reacting to the infection.

Make sure to wash your hands haha!

*edit* sterilize your net / de-hooking equipment as well. best stop the spread of that stuff.
Those red marks are more than likely stress related. I have seen them on pike from Ontario to Alberta and they are definitely not disease. When you see red fins and splotches on the belly of a pike after a battle with them it too is from acids in their bodies from over exertion just like a human's skin colour changing from extended physical exertion. You needn't worry about bleaching your gear because of the pike. I'd be more concerned with the "film" you get on everything from the NSR in downtown Edmonton. You guy's haven't lived until you lip a smallmouth bass from a creek running through a major dairy cattle farming valley and the fish smells of cow ****!!

And Timid your Mom's a good sport to go sit in a canoe and fish with you and be in a great mood laughing and having fun. You're making memories either of you won't ever forget!! I'm happy for you both!!

Last edited by The Spank; 08-23-2017 at 03:15 PM.
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Old 08-23-2017, 05:34 PM
NSR Fisher NSR Fisher is offline
 
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I know the fin tips and stuff is stress related but that rash looking mark on its belly and flanks definitely seems more infection related than stress.

Its common to see it on the fins like you say, but on the belly and sides I would be concerned...

Then again I'm not an expert so I'll take your word on it. Still best to be safe.
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:56 PM
The Spank The Spank is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NSR Fisher View Post
I know the fin tips and stuff is stress related but that rash looking mark on its belly and flanks definitely seems more infection related than stress.

Its common to see it on the fins like you say, but on the belly and sides I would be concerned...

Then again I'm not an expert so I'll take your word on it. Still best to be safe.
I am sure not an expert either. I decided to do use my google fu powers and do some research. I was able to come up with this. Maybe this is what we have witnessed on pike?

Red Sore
Pseudomonas hydrophila is another parasite that lives within the northern pike and causes red sore in them. This bacterium is not known to be transferable to humans, however it significantly reduces the appeal of the fish. Symptoms of this parasite include red lesions on the flesh and muscle of the fish, and these can lead to cancerous tumors. While not infectious to humans, this disease renders the fish nearly inedible because of damage to the meat and can easily spread to other fish.
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Old 08-23-2017, 07:11 PM
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Talking moose Talking moose is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Spank View Post
I am sure not an expert either. I decided to do use my google fu powers and do some research. I was able to come up with this. Maybe this is what we have witnessed on pike?

Red Sore
Pseudomonas hydrophila is another parasite that lives within the northern pike and causes red sore in them. This bacterium is not known to be transferable to humans, however it significantly reduces the appeal of the fish. Symptoms of this parasite include red lesions on the flesh and muscle of the fish, and these can lead to cancerous tumors. While not infectious to humans, this disease renders the fish nearly inedible because of damage to the meat and can easily spread to other fish.
Looks different than that to me. I've seen fish with that condition. Always looks like a giant blood sucker latched onto the fish. Unless maybe an early part of the disease but I'm more inclined to think that these fish are from stress/water temp/oxygen related.
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Old 08-23-2017, 07:56 PM
The Spank The Spank is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Talking moose View Post
Looks different than that to me. I've seen fish with that condition. Always looks like a giant blood sucker latched onto the fish. Unless maybe an early part of the disease but I'm more inclined to think that these fish are from stress/water temp/oxygen related.
That was my initial response. I believe its stress related too.
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Old 08-23-2017, 08:06 PM
NSR Fisher NSR Fisher is offline
 
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I'll take your word Moose but I've caught hundreds of pike and seen red fin tips but never on the belly like that. Then again not every fish Timid caught in that video had it either.

The 36" fish I caught the other week in the NSR fought well and I was using walleye tackle so the fight was even more extended because of that and she had red fin tips but her belly was pale white. Then again the river had good current where I fished and is well oxygenated. Maybe it was the water temperature or oxygen content of the lake like you say. Timid mentioned it was really weedy there so maybe the low O2 was causing the hard fighters to light up like Rudolf when they got exhausted. Blood pushing to the skin in a high fat area like their belly definitely would cause a reddening of the skin. And it would look kind of like capillaries under the skin rather than lesions like Spank described.

Rewatching the video I think you're right and maybe I'm just not used to fishing lakes or rivers with low O2 levels so I've never noticed it.

Weird how geography can effect your perception of life & everything involved in so many ways.

Would love for a biologist to chime in just for peace of mind, though.

Last edited by NSR Fisher; 08-23-2017 at 08:18 PM.
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