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  #1  
Old 09-11-2022, 12:49 PM
45-90scout 45-90scout is offline
 
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Default Sure are a lot of new used 70# bows for sale

Would this be because of injuries sustained then realizing "Oh S**t, this was a little excessive. I'm not in shape and practising is limited to maybe 20 arrows a week if that."
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Old 09-11-2022, 03:30 PM
Smoky buck Smoky buck is offline
 
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Could just be that they are more commonly sold to begin with
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Old 09-11-2022, 03:41 PM
calgarychef calgarychef is offline
 
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I shoot mostly traditional but of all the injuries I hear about the story usually starts “I used to draw at least 70#.” That’s way more wear and tear with every shot.
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Old 09-11-2022, 03:48 PM
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Most traditional archers (myself included)shot big weight at one time, Both Jack Kempf and myself are down from 70 pounds to 40 .
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Old 09-11-2022, 06:47 PM
45-90scout 45-90scout is offline
 
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I used to shoot a 60# compound - then came the rotator cuff and went to a 30# recurve. Now looking for a Hoyt in a 40-50#, but virtually everything I'm finding is in the 60-70. Cant even find limbs to replace
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Old 09-11-2022, 07:15 PM
Smoky buck Smoky buck is offline
 
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60-70# is the most common draw weights 40-50# is not as common and most are women or youth

Most male bow hunters I know are shooting a bow in that 60-70# range.
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  #7  
Old 09-11-2022, 07:37 PM
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Moo Snukkle Moo Snukkle is offline
 
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Back in my archery days, my buddies and I had a rule. We would not shoot a poundage that we couldn’t manage over a 10 second draw cycle. Theory behind it was, if you’re in a stand, and you’re trying to limit movement to not be detected, a very slow, straight back draw may just be the ticket. These were with older 65% let off bows. I worked my way up to 70# which I shot comfortably for 15 yrs, but in all that time going to the local range, not many could manage the poundage they shot over a 10 second draw.
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Old 09-11-2022, 07:43 PM
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part of my practice in my basement is to hold for at least 30 seconds and make a good shot.

I also practice drawing and letting down slowly, then drawing again 5x. This sure works the muscles and has led to me building up strength so I can hold longer and steadier on target.
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  #9  
Old 09-11-2022, 11:10 PM
brewster29 brewster29 is online now
 
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I see a lot of folks (and lots of so called expert hunters on TV) show very poor form - having to raise their bow arm high or swing sideways to draw their bow - a classic sign of too much draw weight. Ideally you’d aim and draw while keeping your bow on target, with next to zero motion. Like others have said you also should be able to hold for at least 30 seconds, a minute would be better.

In my younger days I shot 3d at 90+lbs draw weight (back in the 60% letoff era, seemed fun at the time) now in my 60’s with rotator injuries (wear and tear perhaps?) to both shoulders I had to work for months to get back to 60, was shooting 70 prior to injury. I dropped a bit of arrow weight and my speed is the same.
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Old 09-15-2022, 07:16 PM
Lefty Lefty is offline
 
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One thing about shooting bows is that pretty much everyone I know who shoots them just start shooting them without anyone of us knowing anything about proper form. When in a bow shop (And I was in a few back in the early 80's both here and the States) all any of them said was shoot the highest poundage you can and if it is hard to pull don't worry about it as you are not used to it and after shooting a bit it will be easy to pull. Also back then there was big difference in compound in efficiency between 50 to 60 to 70 pounds unlike the bows of today. You tube is good at showing how to draw a bow without injury and is worth a look for anyone that has never seen. That said I never draw my bow anywhere near what they say is right. The last 35 years of shooting a bow because of injuries (never from pulling a bow) Something about dirt bikes, bucking bulls and horses, and work that somehow didn't agree with certain body parts. I find different bows at the same poundage pull very differently. Even the same line of bow in the manufacture I find pulls very different depending on the length of the bow. Can be a difference of 10 pounds from one to the other as to same comfort level. If one doesn't shoot a poundage that is comfortable to shoot then soreness and injury stops a person from shooting, and also you just don't shoot a too heavy bow very well which also leaves a person not inclined to continue shooting it. The right draw length is also important for pulling.
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  #11  
Old 10-24-2022, 10:41 PM
Gun Gun is offline
 
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I'm one that used to shoot heavy weight. Don't think I'm paying for it now. Just old age and poor genetics.

I shot 75# Recurves back in the day. Late 60's &70's. I drew a 119# Compound once some friends roped me into that a dealer had set up as a joke at a Deer Classic.

The last 15 yrs or so I've crept down to low to mid 50's until nerve damage 4 years ago and tendon tears two years ago. Currently still getting my muscles and range of motion back but hope to be up to 50# normal right handed by spring.

Some of the down turn in weight overall is probably a older hunter group.
Also with carbon arrows and new tuning techniques, front loading and increased FOC create an arrow that doesn't require as much bow poundage to penetrate like the "old days". Everyone seems to want speed in an arrow. I've always said, QUIET will get you more results.

I wouldn't pause a bit to shoot any North American Big Game animal w a 50# bow and 500-700 gr arrows. Along with a cut on contact (COC) broadhead.

I didn't have anyone to teach me how to shoot initially. It wasn't until I found a archery shop w lanes and joined a league that I got tips on form and aiming etc.

BTW Jack can't shoot a bow anymore, tho he can still pull one he's building if its light enough.

I think another reason there are not many bowhunters or heavy Bows is its too much work for people that want instant success.

Last edited by Gun; 10-24-2022 at 10:50 PM.
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  #12  
Old 10-25-2022, 06:48 AM
Dubious Dubious is offline
 
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If people are out and shooting bows having fun does any of this matter? I think you guys are thinking most bow hunters are doing everything perfect, perfect draw perfect technic perfectly applied tactics and theory, the elite bow hunters. When what’s actually happening is guys grab what ever bow they can get, fling 20-30 sticks through it before the season and call it a success until the next year. Most guys I know that bow hunt can’t draw can’t shoot but still kill game and have fun. I’m not going to stop them because they have a poor bow form and terrible equipment.
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  #13  
Old 10-25-2022, 09:03 PM
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I like the 5 gallon bucket test. Sit on the bucket, lift both feet off the ground, then draw your bow, aim, and shoot. If you can maintain your 2" group at 20, 3" group at 30, 4" group at 40... etc., then you are shooting a weight you can handle.

My sweet spot is 64-67 pounds on a 330 to 335 IBO bow.
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Old 10-26-2022, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dubious View Post
If people are out and shooting bows having fun does any of this matter? I think you guys are thinking most bow hunters are doing everything perfect, perfect draw perfect technic perfectly applied tactics and theory, the elite bow hunters. When what’s actually happening is guys grab what ever bow they can get, fling 20-30 sticks through it before the season and call it a success until the next year. Most guys I know that bow hunt can’t draw can’t shoot but still kill game and have fun. I’m not going to stop them because they have a poor bow form and terrible equipment.
Yes it matters, because when pictures hit the news of poor bambi with an arrow stuck in it’s azz, it paints all of us in a negative light. Quick clean kills matter. Educating new bowhunters matters. It’s not about making it road hockey fun. It about doing something hard and doing it well.


There is a noticeable jump from 60 to 70…you have to be very dedicated to draw and shoot 70 well. Took me 5 years to build up to it, and that was in my 20s. But I had a good understanding of the value of simulation training, and always practiced on 3D targets from field positions, and at hunting speed. So I learned real quick that I didn’t want to be overbowed. Tried 80 once…shoulder hurt for a week. 70 is enough for me.
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Old 10-26-2022, 01:36 PM
wildalberta wildalberta is offline
 
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My take is thats the most common size of limbs. Plenty of people gove archey a try and realize it takes a pile of time/money and effort for a a fairly low % of success. With the way of the liberal world that isnt an easy pill to swallow financially.
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