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Old 10-29-2020, 08:27 AM
GummyMonster GummyMonster is offline
 
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Question Wheeler Fat Wrench to Remove screws??

Good morning,
I can't find the answer to this anywhere online, so I'll try the vast knowledge base that's on the AO forum.
Will it hurt a Wheeler Fat Wrench to REMOVE screws?
I use a small strip of thin double sided tape inside scope rings. I torque them down, then let them sit overnight and then retighten, as the tape compresses some.
Can I use the Fat Wrench to back them out to add some locking compound (nail polish) before the final torque down??
I don't want to damage the wrench, so I'm checking.
Thank's in advance for any help,
Ken
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  #2  
Old 10-29-2020, 08:46 AM
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catnthehat catnthehat is online now
 
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No issue at all , tighten the wrench up and twist away !
Cat
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Old 10-29-2020, 10:39 AM
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Dick284 Dick284 is offline
 
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I use a replaceable tip screwdriver kit for screw removals.
If you exceed the torque setting on a torque wrench it throws them way out of calibration( like the Wheeler is calibrated is another topic)

I think I paid like $35 for the screwdriver kit.
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Old 10-29-2020, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick284 View Post
I use a replaceable tip screwdriver kit for screw removals.
If you exceed the torque setting on a torque wrench it throws them way out of calibration( like the Wheeler is calibrated is another topic)

I think I paid like $35 for the screwdriver kit.
I just check mine occasionally against my MAC tools wrench, I never really worry about it too much.
We're taking action screws and scope ring screws, they don't have a lot of torque anyway.
Cat
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:10 AM
AndrewM AndrewM is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catnthehat View Post
I just check mine occasionally against my MAC tools wrench, I never really worry about it too much.
We're taking action screws and scope ring screws, they don't have a lot of torque anyway.
Cat
You would be shocked what people put loctite on!
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:13 AM
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Quote:
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You would be shocked what people put loctite on!
Amazing what hitting screws with a blow dryer or heat gun before going at them with a screw driver will do as well!
Cat
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catnthehat View Post
Amazing what hitting screws with a blow dryer or heat gun before going at them with a screw driver will do as well!
Cat
Luckily I haven't had this issue but I like the idea. Read that some people use a solder gun and touch it to the screw head to help loosen the rust or loctite. Have you tried that?
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewM View Post
Luckily I haven't had this issue but I like the idea. Read that some people use a solder gun and touch it to the screw head to help loosen the rust or loctite. Have you tried that?
Tried it a few times, but the heat gun seems to work quicker for me.
Cat
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:37 AM
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Tried it a few times, but the heat gun seems to work quicker for me.
Cat
Good to know. Thanks! Was worried it may transfer heat elsewhere too much.
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catnthehat View Post
Tried it a few times, but the heat gun seems to work quicker for me.
Cat
Kroil, or Deep Creep, mixed with a drop of acetone, and a bit of heat, even just sitting it on a heat register.
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Old 10-29-2020, 01:36 PM
GummyMonster GummyMonster is offline
 
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Thanks for the affirmation.
These are screws which have already been removed, cleaned, and are just getting their final tightening.
Ken
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Old 10-29-2020, 01:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewM View Post
Good to know. Thanks! Was worried it may transfer heat elsewhere too much.
A soldering iron, like one used for electronics, will actually transfer less heat in undesired areas than a heat gun would. The heat gun will have less heat but spread it over a broader area. It just depends on the application, but either one will work for this.
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Old 10-29-2020, 01:47 PM
AndrewM AndrewM is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GummyMonster View Post
Thanks for the affirmation.
These are screws which have already been removed, cleaned, and are just getting their final tightening.
Ken
Sorry for taking thread off track on you. Yes they can remove screws. For me I would rather use a different screw driver to avoid the chance of pushing it out of calibration.
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Old 10-29-2020, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottmisfits View Post
A soldering iron, like one used for electronics, will actually transfer less heat in undesired areas than a heat gun would. The heat gun will have less heat but spread it over a broader area. It just depends on the application, but either one will work for this.
Was meaning heat gun transfer heat other places too much.
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Old 10-29-2020, 02:22 PM
Ranger CS Ranger CS is offline
 
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Again, not to derail, but it's worth mentioning that when loctite or any other lubricating substance is applied to screws prior to torquing, the torque values will read less than actual as a result of the lubricating effect. Otherwise stated when using something like loctite be careful you don't over torque. Technically, I believe this referred to and differentiated as wet and dry torque values.
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Old 10-29-2020, 10:07 PM
32-40win 32-40win is offline
 
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The idea as I always understood it, was to heat the area around the screw to get it to expand away from the screw.
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  #17  
Old 10-29-2020, 10:08 PM
Cottus Cottus is offline
 
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I've always been taught that you don't use a torque wrench/driver to loosen a nut/screw. Some workplace QA policies even state that you shan't even use the torque wrench to tighten a nut, just to get the final torque value. It's always been easier for me to find another tool than to worry about the (possible? imaginary?) consequences. Especially the Fatwrench comes with the bits you need anyways, just put them in a driver. I surely may be overthinking it though.
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Old 10-29-2020, 10:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 32-40win View Post
The idea as I always understood it, was to heat the area around the screw to get it to expand away from the screw.
Yes or heat up the oil so it penetrates further.
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Old 10-29-2020, 11:33 PM
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Just use a normal screwdriver, then you dont have to mess with the fat wrench. It’s much easier.

I use blue loctite on all my bases and rings, haven’t had a single problem yet.
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  #20  
Old 10-29-2020, 11:52 PM
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I use a heat gun to liquify the Lock Tite not to expand the metal .
I also have no issues using a torque wrench to check if a set of screws are at their torque specs .
I am not about to get crazy and use a normal screwdriver to tighten stuff up then set up a Wheeler fat wrench to final torque .
We aren't talking about 40 foot pounds of torque here .
Some people get you crazy about rules and procedures "just because "

In fact the only reason I use one of these things is because I got one as a gift and the other in a bunch of stuff I squired
I also know many top shelf 'smiths and match shooters who never did use them and are not about to start because they think it is just something that is not needed if a person uses a bit of common sense and not a ham fisted technique
They still seem to be building great rigles and winning matches as well.
Cat
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  #21  
Old 10-30-2020, 08:49 AM
AndrewM AndrewM is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catnthehat View Post
I use a heat gun to liquify the Lock Tite not to expand the metal .
I also have no issues using a torque wrench to check if a set of screws are at their torque specs .
I am not about to get crazy and use a normal screwdriver to tighten stuff up then set up a Wheeler fat wrench to final torque .
We aren't talking about 40 foot pounds of torque here .
Some people get you crazy about rules and procedures "just because "

In fact the only reason I use one of these things is because I got one as a gift and the other in a bunch of stuff I squired
I also know many top shelf 'smiths and match shooters who never did use them and are not about to start because they think it is just something that is not needed if a person uses a bit of common sense and not a ham fisted technique
They still seem to be building great rigles and winning matches as well.
Cat
Unfortunately common sense doesn't always prevail. Many people barely ever touch a rifle screw and they tend to over torque or under torque or twist the screw right off.
I don't use my torque wrench to remove lug nuts either. Would rather keep the precision instruments to minimal use.
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  #22  
Old 10-30-2020, 07:15 PM
Steyr Luxus Steyr Luxus is offline
 
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Is the fat wrench rated for clockwise and counterclockwise directions? If you use one rated for clockwise and us it counterclockwise you will bugger it up regardless of amount of torque you are braking. Yes, you can use a torque wrench for removing fasteners (i.e. braking torque) however it must be rated counterclockwise. Torques are rated as class 1 or 2 as eluded to in post #15 by Ranger CS.
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  #23  
Old 10-30-2020, 08:23 PM
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catnthehat catnthehat is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger CS View Post
Again, not to derail, but it's worth mentioning that when loctite or any other lubricating substance is applied to screws prior to torquing, the torque values will read less than actual as a result of the lubricating effect. Otherwise stated when using something like loctite be careful you don't over torque. Technically, I believe this referred to and differentiated as wet and dry torque values.
Wet and dry torque specs are given in the sheet supplied with a Wheeler kit.
Wheeler also states that the FAT wrench works in BOTH directions.

Cat
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Last edited by catnthehat; 10-30-2020 at 08:32 PM.
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  #24  
Old 10-31-2020, 07:23 AM
GummyMonster GummyMonster is offline
 
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"Wheeler fat wrench works in both directions "

Thanks for confirming my original question cat.
I missed that in the instructions somehow.
And as I said, I'm only using it to back out screws that have been removed with a regular driver, cleaned and torqued. I would only use it to remove these screws to add a little nail polish and re torque.
I'd never use it to loosen screws of unknown tightness.
Thanks ,
Ken
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  #25  
Old 11-01-2020, 06:31 PM
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EZM EZM is offline
 
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I wouldn't hesitate in using it to back out a screw ......... unless it's really stuck hard. Then it's a matter of grabbing another driver before I start with adding any heat or penetrant.

I also use the lowest color rating (purple) lock tight just to add a little adhesion when torqueing them down using the wet spec.

I also do a light lapping and good clean up in the saddles which seems to help everything seat neatly.

.......with screws that small, you have to be careful.
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  #26  
Old 11-01-2020, 07:00 PM
stubby99ca stubby99ca is offline
 
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All of the best millwrights I have worked with on engines, compressors and turbines never used a torque wrench to remove anything. Some would go absolutely ballistic at the mere mention of doing so. But some people will do it because it is possible.
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  #27  
Old 11-01-2020, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stubby99ca View Post
All of the best millwrights I have worked with on engines, compressors and turbines never used a torque wrench to remove anything. Some would go absolutely ballistic at the mere mention of doing so. But some people will do it because it is possible.
Not all screw are right hand thread and a torque wrench is used to check if a screw is torqued properly to begin with ,
Cat
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