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  #211  
Old 01-05-2022, 12:34 AM
tranq78 tranq78 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by fishnguy View Post
I believe there were a couple of ďeditionsĒ of that knife. The second is available at a few outlets in Canada. About $50 last I saw. Some mediocre steel, canít recall exactly what, but feel like below aus8 grade. I am sure it is fine for chopping deer apart.

Edit:

Donít know about this place, but it is only $39 there: https://foodzinga.ca/bow-river

This place is legit: https://www.warriorsandwonders.com/S...Leather_Sheath (I think their shipping is reasonable $10, or it was for knives I bought from there in the past)

Those are good prices for a Spyderco. But be aware the knives are made in China. The made in USA or Japan Spyderco's are at least triple the price for similar products.

Not saying anything good or bad about country of origin. Just wanted to point out the reason for the price so no one gets surprised later.
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  #212  
Old 01-05-2022, 01:56 AM
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Originally Posted by tranq78 View Post
Those are good prices for a Spyderco. But be aware the knives are made in China. The made in USA or Japan Spyderco's are at least triple the price for similar products.

Not saying anything good or bad about country of origin. Just wanted to point out the reason for the price so no one gets surprised later.
Yup I was disappointed to see it was chinesium but for $50 its a good knife and if I happen to leave it in the bush I won't be too sad. I have other spydercos I would be more sad about losing.
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  #213  
Old 01-05-2022, 03:13 AM
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Hey fellas. I figured I would be exact about my budget, so in your experience, what skinning knife would you get for $200 or less?

No removable blade jobbies.

I know that is not a high end knife by any stretch, but it is all I got to put toward one at this time.

Thanks in advance for your replies!
Get Victorinox https://highcaliberproducts.com/prod...orinox/page/6/

All butcher knives you need for 98 $. Done. I have two of those knives. I like skinning curved knife, very sharp and easy to use and sharp.

THey are more like professional butcher knives. Not your typical belt knives.
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  #214  
Old 01-05-2022, 08:53 AM
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What I like about this thread is it is clear there is a lot that goes into a high quality knife. And, it seems to me there is no such thing as one best steel, rather a lot of great ones that need to be tailored to the job it will be asked to do, and the habits/abilities of the guy who is going to carry it.
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  #215  
Old 01-05-2022, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by sns2 View Post
What I like about this thread is it is clear there is a lot that goes into a high quality knife. And, it seems to me there is no such thing as one best steel, rather a lot of great ones that need to be tailored to the job it will be asked to do, and the habits/abilities of the guy who is going to carry it.
Well, opinions are like a_oles, everyone has one and everyone thinks theirs is more important......inlcuding me sometimes! LOL

What I learned was I needed more knives to validate my opinion so I ordered a couple......HAHA See what you started.
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  #216  
Old 01-05-2022, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by sns2 View Post
What I like about this thread is it is clear there is a lot that goes into a high quality knife. And, it seems to me there is no such thing as one best steel, rather a lot of great ones that need to be tailored to the job it will be asked to do, and the habits/abilities of the guy who is going to carry it.
When I was younger I found (and was taught) that there is a middle ground between sharpenability and edge holding . It seems these days that the focus often is on super sharp steels, the draw back being theyvtake a lot longer to sharpen once they get even a bit dull.
There are likely hundreds of different sharpening g systems on ghe market as well, and not all are suited to every type of steel.
You are right Sns2, A person needs to find the knife and sharpening system they like, and it may not match up with the next guy's ideas as this thread has shown.
Cat
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  #217  
Old 01-05-2022, 02:20 PM
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I was digging around in my knife drawer and thought some of you might like to see this. It is an original Russel Belt knife in Stainless steel. It is from the first prototype non- production run in 1957, prior to the issuing of the Design Registration in 1958, which was added to the Recasso on all production knives from 1958 to 1978. The registration was only good for 20 years so had to be renewed in 1978. When the Design Registration was renewed the Recasso after that showed the later registration date. The first knives were marked Russel Belt Knife, Canada on one side, with a large S in a circle for Stainless steel, and Made in Canada alone on the other side. They became D.H. Russel later and then they added the Grohman markings. Notice the brass pins, they switched to nickle pins later on but I do not recall what year that was. Notice the difference in the later blade shape on the current production version picture below as well as the handle shape also changed quite a bit on the post 1958 and later models. It looks more like the current Boat, Army Yatchsman version

My father got this one in 1957 and I can only assume it was a test version. These were also issued to soldiers at one point in time so that may be where he first acquired it as he was in the service from 1943 to 1973..







Here is a picture of the current Grohman Russel Belt knife

Note the difference in the handle design.


Last edited by Dean2; 01-05-2022 at 02:40 PM.
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  #218  
Old 01-05-2022, 02:44 PM
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That is very interesting Dean. The 1958 knife that I made the tandem sheath for is more like the later version, not the boat knife .
Cat
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  #219  
Old 01-05-2022, 02:46 PM
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Classic piece of history you have there Dean. Sharpen her up and take it out for a stroll!

That design has been emulated by many makers since because it does work well.

What Cat said about sharpen ability, toughness and edge retention is right. You have to find the balance you want to work with for the job you intend it for.

Personally I like the range of 80crv2 thru NitroV and D2 up to S35v for field work. I have M4 and even L6 blades that will hold an edge through ridiculous amounts of cutting but take forever to rebuild when required even with quality diamond stones.
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  #220  
Old 01-05-2022, 04:23 PM
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Dean, your Dad's knife is the same as my Dad's was. However, they are the Russell (now Grohmann) #3 Boat Knife. Thy are also referred to as "jump knife" by military guys who often got them, as well as Yachtsman Knife in the boating community. I read somewhere the name boat knife came from the triangular handle resembling the shape of a boat. I can't vouch for that. What I do know is that the military still gives #3s out as recognition because I saw one for sale today that had lettering and logo on it to recognize those who were part of the Kandahar Mission.

The more popular, and iconic is the Russell Belt Knife, though they are both regarded as very comfortable knives.





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  #221  
Old 01-05-2022, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by sns2 View Post
Hey fellas. I figured I would be exact about my budget, so in your experience, what skinning knife would you get for $200 or less?

No removable blade jobbies.

I know that is not a high end knife by any stretch, but it is all I got to put toward one at this time.

Thanks in advance for your replies!
Here is the Manly site in Ontario....D2 steel for around $100.....my son has the Patriot and loves it and great steel.

https://www.srknivesandswords.com/co...nives-bulgaria
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  #222  
Old 01-05-2022, 04:55 PM
Ken3134 Ken3134 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Dean2 View Post
I was digging around in my knife drawer and thought some of you might like to see this. It is an original Russel Belt knife in Stainless steel. It is from the first prototype non- production run in 1957, prior to the issuing of the Design Registration in 1958, which was added to the Recasso on all production knives from 1958 to 1978. The registration was only good for 20 years so had to be renewed in 1978. When the Design Registration was renewed the Recasso after that showed the later registration date. The first knives were marked Russel Belt Knife, Canada on one side, with a large S in a circle for Stainless steel, and Made in Canada alone on the other side. They became D.H. Russel later and then they added the Grohman markings. Notice the brass pins, they switched to nickle pins later on but I do not recall what year that was. Notice the difference in the later blade shape on the current production version picture below as well as the handle shape also changed quite a bit on the post 1958 and later models. It looks more like the current Boat, Army Yatchsman version

My father got this one in 1957 and I can only assume it was a test version. These were also issued to soldiers at one point in time so that may be where he first acquired it as he was in the service from 1943 to 1973..







Here is a picture of the current Grohman Russel Belt knife

Note the difference in the handle design.

That is a really cool knife Dean, and is likely collectible to a lot of folks. Please donít be offended, but the S with a circle around it does not stand for stainless steel, it actually stands for ďsecondĒ meaning itís a factory second and marked as such as it would have been sold without warranty. That does not change what I said in the beginning it is a cool old knife that is part of the companies heritage.

Ken
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  #223  
Old 01-05-2022, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Ken3134 View Post
That is a really cool knife Dean, and is likely collectible to a lot of folks. Please donít be offended, but the S with a circle around it does not stand for stainless steel, it actually stands for ďsecondĒ meaning itís a factory second and marked as such as it would have been sold without warranty. That does not change what I said in the beginning it is a cool old knife that is part of the companies heritage.

Ken
No offence taken but you are incorrect. There is an S on more modern knives and it does stand for second, but they do not have a circle around them. Even according to Grohman's site, the S in a circle means stainless. The original knives were all hand made, the company did not sell seconds back then, that is a much more recent thing. I remember my dad using this knife out hunting in the mid 60s when I was 8 or 9 years old, so I am positive it is not one of the modern ones. Also, the fact the Recasso is not marked RD 1958 or RD 1962 means its "made" date predates the Registration of Design dates.

You can find the information here if you like.

https://www.grohmannknives.com/index...ough-the-years


Through the Years
Is it a Grohmann?

Curious about that knife you've always carried? Wonder if the blades you use at work are Grohmann? Is it a real Grohmann knife, or a copy? For instance, there have been around 16 copies of our Original #1 Design that we know of! Below are some product pictures and descriptions to help you decide if you have the real deal or not, plus some special order items and other interesting facts through the years.

Grohmann Stamps/Blade Markings

Materials Used

Stamps/Blade Markings

Tang Stamps - Russell Belt Knife, D.H. Russell Belt Knife, Grohmann, Pictou, Nova Scotia, model numbers, stainless or carbon

R2S showing registered trademark "RD 1962" RD meaning registered, and the year that the model was registered. These knives were stamped for 20 yrs this way, so if yours has this stamp it could have been made anywhere from 1962-1982.

Original DH Russell lockblade

Steak Knives, Chef & Bread Knives with older Grohmann Knives logos


Old Blades Stamps - "S" with a circle around it meant "Stainless", a "C" with a circle around it meant Carbon

Materials Used

Initially: Various steels and handle materials such as Swedish Carbon, Brazilian Rosewood, Moose horn, caribou,
Switched to East Indian Rosewood (respecting rainforests), German hi-carbon stainless and carbon steels. Handle materials still varying from everything from turquoise to water buffalo
Original sheaths were hand-molded leather and were at one time done in the factory
Brass Rivets were originally used in the knives, then nickel-silver, then aluminum and now back to brass rivets.
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  #224  
Old 01-05-2022, 08:58 PM
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Originally Posted by catnthehat View Post
When I was younger I found (and was taught) that there is a middle ground between sharpenability and edge holding . It seems these days that the focus often is on super sharp steels, the draw back being theyvtake a lot longer to sharpen once they get even a bit dull.
There are likely hundreds of different sharpening g systems on ghe market as well, and not all are suited to every type of steel.
You are right Sns2, A person needs to find the knife and sharpening system they like, and it may not match up with the next guy's ideas as this thread has shown.
Cat
Totally agree. A butcher friend of the family gifted me a wood handled stainless steel when I was about 12. $75ish at the time.I was shooting tons of gophers, muskrats, beavers, magpies, badgers, anything pesky on the ranch.

I started sharpening it with a round 2 sided stone I bought at McLeods with 4-H calf money. Many, many game later, they're my go to & I can skin & gut plenty fast enough to keep my hands warm. I've bought a couple others, but that cheap, simple combo has it's place.

Still going to look at a Chisan though.
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  #225  
Old 01-06-2022, 03:36 PM
CptnBlues63 CptnBlues63 is offline
 
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I've tried quite a few hunting knives over the years and I've settled on Cutco's clip point straight edge (as vs their double D edge.....bought one of those first, now I have the other....lol)

Holds an edge very well. A couple quick strops over my diamond steel after every critter I dress/skin and it's sharp enough to shave with again.

My only complaint is the formed grip. I would prefer they put the same kind of handle on it they do on their K-Bar.

I've been using the Cutco filetting knife for many years and it's great too. It was too sharp out of the box, first time I tried to lift the meat off the skin it went right through the skin so whenever I strop it on my diamond steel, I run the edge down my wooden filetting table once so it doesn't do that.

.
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  #226  
Old 01-06-2022, 05:22 PM
Mb-MBR Mb-MBR is offline
 
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All this talk of knives, I decided to buy a boning knife off Clint which arrived today and must say its a nice looking blade. Now I'll have to relegate my filleting knife I cut down decades ago to backup duties.......
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  #227  
Old 01-06-2022, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Mb-MBR View Post
All this talk of knives, I decided to buy a boning knife off Clint which arrived today and must say its a nice looking blade. Now I'll have to relegate my filleting knife I cut down decades ago to backup duties.......
Good to hear. Pictures please.

Just as an aside, I posted a wack of knives for sale on here and CGN. I can't believe the level of interest in buying knives. Less than a day and have sold four and got probably a dozen pms.

A few from the collection.





Last edited by Dean2; 01-06-2022 at 05:41 PM.
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  #228  
Old 01-06-2022, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Dean2 View Post
Just as an aside, I posted a wack of knives for sale on here and CGN. I can't believe the level of interest in buying knives.
Thereís a large fraternity of knife enthusiasts. Spyderco will drop a 2000 piece dealer exclusive and itíll sell out in 5-6 minutes with a 2 knife per customer limit. Of all the customs Iíve sold itís never taken more then 3 hours to sell one. Iíve only sold one in Canada but the states has a red hot market for them. Watch Fort Henry, when he lists a dozier, 9 times out of 10 itíll be gone within five minutes.
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  #229  
Old 01-06-2022, 06:12 PM
Ken3134 Ken3134 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Dean2 View Post
No offence taken but you are incorrect. There is an S on more modern knives and it does stand for second, but they do not have a circle around them. Even according to Grohman's site, the S in a circle means stainless. The original knives were all hand made, the company did not sell seconds back then, that is a much more recent thing. I remember my dad using this knife out hunting in the mid 60s when I was 8 or 9 years old, so I am positive it is not one of the modern ones. Also, the fact the Recasso is not marked RD 1958 or RD 1962 means its "made" date predates the Registration of Design dates.

You can find the information here if you like.

https://www.grohmannknives.com/index...ough-the-years


Through the Years
Is it a Grohmann?

Curious about that knife you've always carried? Wonder if the blades you use at work are Grohmann? Is it a real Grohmann knife, or a copy? For instance, there have been around 16 copies of our Original #1 Design that we know of! Below are some product pictures and descriptions to help you decide if you have the real deal or not, plus some special order items and other interesting facts through the years.

Grohmann Stamps/Blade Markings

Materials Used

Stamps/Blade Markings

Tang Stamps - Russell Belt Knife, D.H. Russell Belt Knife, Grohmann, Pictou, Nova Scotia, model numbers, stainless or carbon

R2S showing registered trademark "RD 1962" RD meaning registered, and the year that the model was registered. These knives were stamped for 20 yrs this way, so if yours has this stamp it could have been made anywhere from 1962-1982.

Original DH Russell lockblade

Steak Knives, Chef & Bread Knives with older Grohmann Knives logos


Old Blades Stamps - "S" with a circle around it meant "Stainless", a "C" with a circle around it meant Carbon

Materials Used

Initially: Various steels and handle materials such as Swedish Carbon, Brazilian Rosewood, Moose horn, caribou,
Switched to East Indian Rosewood (respecting rainforests), German hi-carbon stainless and carbon steels. Handle materials still varying from everything from turquoise to water buffalo
Original sheaths were hand-molded leather and were at one time done in the factory
Brass Rivets were originally used in the knives, then nickel-silver, then aluminum and now back to brass rivets.
Well thatís good! I have bought and seen several Grohmans over the years donít think Jve seen one with the circled c but have seen seconds with the s and guess I assumed. This is my old #1 carbon with the buffalo horn handle.

Ken
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  #230  
Old 01-06-2022, 06:43 PM
Mb-MBR Mb-MBR is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Dean2 View Post
Good to hear. Pictures please.

Just as an aside, I posted a wack of knives for sale on here and CGN. I can't believe the level of interest in buying knives. Less than a day and have sold four and got probably a dozen pms.

A few from the collection.



Hope this works......
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File Type: jpg Clint Chisan Knife 2.jpg (66.7 KB, 380 views)
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  #231  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:11 PM
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Hope this works......
That AEB steel is pretty nice to sharpen and cut with !
Cat
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  #232  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:14 PM
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I use this sucker for all my gutting and skinning. I find it very well balanced, and the blaze orange handle has saved my tush a few times when I've placed it down while dressing a deer in low light.



I also carry this Havalon knife. I rarely use the skinning blades as I'm a meathead who'll run them across bones and dull the crap out of them in a very short period of time. The saw is handy as hell, but like others have said, they gum up with gunk pretty quickly, and if it's cold, things can get frustrating.

All this talk has really got me thinking of a custom Buck 110 though. What would the wise elders of the AO forum suggest:

s30v or 420hc?
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  #233  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:27 PM
Bushleague Bushleague is offline
 
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I have a Grohmann 100 for skinning. Works great and keeps an edge but wouldnít work well for breaking an animal down because it chips very easily. I watched a buddy take two chops to take a Whitetail tail off once before I could say anything. When he handed it back to me there was 2 chips where he hit bone. I spent some time sharpening the chips out and itís worked great ever since for its intended purpose.
My Grohman has quartered about a half dozen moose and several elk... no chips. I have a couple different ones, and the #1 is my favorite for sure. I attempt to chop through bone with any of my knives though...

Another favorite is an old Western Cutlery knife I have, which I believe was made in the late 50's. Its probably got some of the hardest carbon steel that I've run across.

If I didnt want to spend the money on a Grohmann I'd just use a Mora, good steel and a decent design. Only problem is the plastic sheaths are noisy if you wear them on your belt, since I rarely carry a pack I'd need to get a leather sheath.
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  #234  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:41 PM
Mb-MBR Mb-MBR is offline
 
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I use this sucker for all my gutting and skinning. I find it very well balanced, and the blaze orange handle has saved my tush a few times when I've placed it down while dressing a deer in low light.



I also carry this Havalon knife. I rarely use the skinning blades as I'm a meathead who'll run them across bones and dull the crap out of them in a very short period of time. The saw is handy as hell, but like others have said, they gum up with gunk pretty quickly, and if it's cold, things can get frustrating.

All this talk has really got me thinking of a custom Buck 110 though. What would the wise elders of the AO forum suggest:

s30v or 420hc?
Why second guess your decision, I say both.....
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  #235  
Old 01-06-2022, 10:29 PM
Bushleague Bushleague is offline
 
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[IMG

All this talk has really got me thinking of a custom Buck 110 though. What would the wise elders of the AO forum suggest:

s30v or 420hc?
I like the Buck 420hc, it performs pretty close to what I've come to expect from a carbon steel blade. Takes a good edge pretty easily and holds it well enough for most jobs. It will dress and skin a deer no problem, but if you want to quarter a moose or elk its going to need a few touch ups.

Personally I much prefer the slightly smaller Buck 112. I like the shorter blade, while the handle is still a good fit for my fairly large hands. A somewhat rare combination. I prefer my Grohmann #1, but the 112 is by far my favorite folder for hunting.
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  #236  
Old 01-07-2022, 04:02 AM
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Hope this works......
That looks good. Let us know how it cuts.
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  #237  
Old 01-07-2022, 06:51 AM
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Here's an old Russel #1 Belt Knife I found in a pawn shop. $20 out the door.

I was glad to find out it was the older carbon steel instead of stainless. Good old knife and a perfect shape for a field/skinning knife. The drop point is a big plus for opening up the paunch in the field as well as skinning out the legs of game. The elliptical blade works for skinning at any angle. I dare say there is not a better field knife shape out there.





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  #238  
Old 01-07-2022, 07:05 AM
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The knife on the left is a Bark River Canadian. It's a bit big for deer but has seen good service for moose and on caribou. The steel holds an edge better than the Russell below, esp for skinning which I find to be hard on any knife.



Inside a Yukon Mountain Caribou in 2010.



Here is the same knife after I had it re-shaped to approximate the Russell. It was big improvement over the original shape.

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  #239  
Old 01-07-2022, 09:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Bushleague View Post
I like the Buck 420hc, it performs pretty close to what I've come to expect from a carbon steel blade. Takes a good edge pretty easily and holds it well enough for most jobs. It will dress and skin a deer no problem, but if you want to quarter a moose or elk its going to need a few touch ups.

Personally I much prefer the slightly smaller Buck 112. I like the shorter blade, while the handle is still a good fit for my fairly large hands. A somewhat rare combination. I prefer my Grohmann #1, but the 112 is by far my favorite folder for hunting.
Good to know, thanks for the advice!
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Old 01-07-2022, 09:58 AM
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DirtShooter DirtShooter is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Mb-MBR View Post
Hope this works......
Wow that is a NICE knife.
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