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Old 04-17-2024, 05:49 PM
2 Tollers 2 Tollers is offline
 
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Default Why Wind and Solar are not winning

Interesting article by Bjorn Lomborg. Bjorn is a standalone push back against the UN mandates for global warming.

He brings economic facts to the conferences that are not disputed --- they just basically put him on ignore. Well worth tracking his research and articles.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/tops...ng/ar-BB1lLNns

Here is anothee article of his on the decline of climate caused deaths

https://financialpost.com/opinion/we...eaths-way-down
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Old 04-18-2024, 10:21 AM
W921 W921 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by 2 Tollers View Post
Interesting article by Bjorn Lomborg. Bjorn is a standalone push back against the UN mandates for global warming.

He brings economic facts to the conferences that are not disputed --- they just basically put him on ignore. Well worth tracking his research and articles.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/tops...ng/ar-BB1lLNns

Here is anothee article of his on the decline of climate caused deaths

https://financialpost.com/opinion/we...eaths-way-down
These solar projects in the long term are going to be a disaster. Once the lifespan or viability is gone the cleanup will be impossible. Way to expensive.
They are selling this to public as green and how they are still farming the land with sheep but at some point the tame grass will be run out and non productive with weeds.
How do you prepare a seedbed or get in there with equipment to reseed?
Its not just a simple as taking away the panels. Its all the just below the ground junk that you can't see.
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  #3  
Old 04-18-2024, 12:10 PM
-JR- -JR- is online now
 
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My nabber has one side of his roof full of solar panels (26) that feeds power to the Edmonton grid . He's had it for 5 years . Gets his gas and electric from co-op. He said in the last two years he his only forked out $230 to the power company for his gas and electricity. He said if it was not for that long cold spell we had this last winter his gas and power bill would have been 0 .for the last two years . His power credit was so high it even paid for those handling charges .

Last week we had a solar panel sale men at the door ,and i asked him ,if i could get 26 panels so i could sell power to the grid for a credit towards my power bill.

The answer was no ,and that they cut back on how many you can have

Just does not make sense ,last year Edmonton was short on power and we had to cut back on using any of our power products in each house hold .

Whats this world coming to ?
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Old 04-18-2024, 03:53 PM
daveyn daveyn is offline
 
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just went through the process of looking at solar for the house. found out that you cannot equip your property to produce more power than you would normally use as evidenced by your power bills. or in other words, we don't want you producing excess power to the grid cause we don't want to pay you instead of you paying us. I understand perhaps incorrectly, that is provincial legislation.
I inquired about what if I want to upgrade put electric heat in my garage in the future (i don't but i put it out there) the response was that after the upgrade we could apply to have additional panels installed, but not before. Just seems kind of backwards thinking to me. If a person can produce extra power and add it to the grid at no infrastructure expense to you why wouldn't you be okay with that?
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Old 04-18-2024, 06:20 PM
dmcbride dmcbride is offline
 
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They are limiting the amount of solar one can install because someone else needs to build full time backup because solar is intermittent.
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  #6  
Old 04-18-2024, 09:13 PM
roper1 roper1 is offline
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They are limiting the amount of solar one can install because someone else needs to build full time backup because solar is intermittent.
^^^^^^this^^^^^^^
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  #7  
Old 04-18-2024, 11:00 PM
Mountain Guy Mountain Guy is offline
 
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Originally Posted by daveyn View Post
just went through the process of looking at solar for the house. found out that you cannot equip your property to produce more power than you would normally use as evidenced by your power bills. or in other words, we don't want you producing excess power to the grid cause we don't want to pay you instead of you paying us. I understand perhaps incorrectly, that is provincial legislation.
I inquired about what if I want to upgrade put electric heat in my garage in the future (i don't but i put it out there) the response was that after the upgrade we could apply to have additional panels installed, but not before. Just seems kind of backwards thinking to me. If a person can produce extra power and add it to the grid at no infrastructure expense to you why wouldn't you be okay with that?
Backfeeding solar into the system is not viable. Well...not everyone doing it anyway. The electrical distribution system was not designed to back feed into the system.
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Old 04-18-2024, 11:09 PM
Mountain Guy Mountain Guy is offline
 
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They are limiting the amount of solar one can install because someone else needs to build full time backup because solar is intermittent.
Exactly.
People want free power when the sun shines and the wind blows, but when it's dark ,cold and calm they want somebody to ensure they have heat and light.
How is this sustainable for distribution and generation companies? They need to maintain the infrastructure for if and when you might need it??
And so why are your distribution / transmission charges so much??
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  #9  
Old 04-19-2024, 08:58 AM
W921 W921 is offline
 
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I like the idea of people who want solar example in Edmonton can build it on their property instead of some guy selling sections of farm land that he does not live next to or look at but he can basically destroy the land at a profit, move away and then his neighbors have to look at it.
Its even worse if you are a neighbor and they force the power lines across your place to go to the solar dump.
If Cities want solar for their air conditioning etc then they should build the solar on their own houses.
I suspect certain people make big money on these big projects. I suspect they dont really wasn't individuals doing this in any kind of numbers?
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Old 04-19-2024, 10:03 AM
Scott h Scott h is offline
 
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Backfeeding solar into the system is not viable. Well...not everyone doing it anyway. The electrical distribution system was not designed to back feed into the system.
Funny, back feeding solar from roof tops back into the grid works quite well in BC. Four homes on my street alone do it.
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  #11  
Old 04-19-2024, 10:12 AM
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Sundancefisher Sundancefisher is offline
 
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Funny, back feeding solar from roof tops back into the grid works quite well in BC. Four homes on my street alone do it.
Buddyís cottage in Ontario does the same thing. They cut him a yearly cheque.
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Old 04-19-2024, 03:19 PM
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Coiloil37 Coiloil37 is offline
 
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Iíll give my unsolicited opinion.

Iím across Bjornís work, his books and his think tank. A man with a very logical approach to the problems he tries to solve and he does great work IMO. Itís a pity he doesnít get more traction in the grande scheme of things.

As for solar. From experience it works very well, on my house. In my location and it easily meets my energy needs. Reality is most of my neighbours must feel the same.





Just because it works so well here doesnít mean it works as well in Alberta. Having lived in both places Iíll tell you why.

First and most importantly is the way the utility companies bill us. Youíre well aware how it works in Alberta, here they charge me per kw/h and thatís it. If I use zero in a month my bill is zero. There are no transmission, rate rider or BS fees.

The cost to buy and install a system is really inexpensive.

We get a LOT of sun.

My solar powers my houses demand first then back feeds the grid and I get paid per kw/h thatís back fed. When my demand exceeds my own supply I buy off the grid. We smash the power during the day while we are making our own. Things like A/C, laundry, dishwasher etc are prioritised for when the suns up and the system on the roof keeps the bill very small. Not zero but power costs far less than a coffee per day.

I work with guys who have battery backups. Their inverters prioritise this way. The solar powers the house, then charges the batteries then back feeds the grid. When they need power it pulls from the solar, then the batteries then the grid. I have one friend with a 12.5kw Tesla powerwall and he never uses from the grid. After a night of watching TV and running lights, A/C etc. the battery is depleted about 20% (80% left). Within two hours of the sun being up in the morning the battery is at 100%. For the rest of the day his solar feeds his house or sells to the grid. He never sees a bill, his credit with the power company grows every month and when the grids power supply is disrupted he doesnít notice. Last Christmas they had a nasty storm and the power was down for more than a week but he didnít notice because he had his battery.

Here on a single phase meter we can back feed up to 5.5 kw/h so most of us run around 6-8 kw/h systems on our roof. If you have a 3 phase meter you can back feed 15 kw/h and one buddyís got that so he has a 22 kw system on his roof.

A solar system on a roof is cheap. I honestly have no idea why all my neighbourís donít have it. Hereís one of many options. Literally the first google hit, itís not cherry picked for price.





Now, would I do it in Alberta knowing how much sun you get, the cost and lifespan of the panels and how specifically HOW your billed for power? Nope.

Iím also not convinced it scales AT ALL. I would assume it does up to the size of a commercial building but probably not for a couple of sections of land cleared to be a solar ďfarmĒ and itís not a viable solution for the ďgridĒ. That doesnít change the fact that it can be useful and more then pay for itself for some of us.
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