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Old 09-26-2023, 03:39 PM
Macdrizzle Macdrizzle is offline
 
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Default Will geese decoys attract ducks (and vice versa)?

I am very new to waterfowl hunting and Iím looking for some tips on decoys from you experts on here. I scouted a couple of fields/ponds Id like to try this fall season and I am looking at purchasing a dozen or so decoys. I am looking to get mainly any of the duck species that are legal to harvest plus some Canada geese and/or specklebellies. My questions are:

1. Is there a ďcommonĒ decoy that will attract all the species or will a mallard decoy only attract mallards, Canada geese decoys attract only Canadas, and so on?
2. Same deal with calls, do I need a goose call specifically If I want Canadas or will a duck call work on geese? Any recommendations for a beginner's call?
3. Is a dozen decoys a good number to start?
4. If anybody is looking to sell their decoys Iíd be interested in buying them off you please DM me.

Thanks in advance!
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Old 09-26-2023, 04:18 PM
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Dick284 Dick284 is offline
 
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Ducks into a goose spread, no problem.

Geese into a duck spread, is pretty iffyÖÖ.

Field shoots are way different than water shoots.

Iím a field shoot guy, btw.

Match the decoys to the species, for the most part, although pintails decoy into mallard decoys very well. Iíve had specks and snows come into Canada spreads, but only if the spotted shoot is a mixed bag shoot. Snows are a different gig all together and require a long talk over a few drams of scotch.

I hunted canadas very effectively with 2 dozen regular shell decoys and a dozen 42Ē shells, and a home made willow blind frame, in the day.

Now I seem to be running 2 dozen full body, and a dozen 42ís(place to put the dead) and a dozen full body mallards(if I expect ducks) and a less than homemade willow blind. And well, things still work for me and my buddies.

As for calls, match the call to the goose, avoid short Canada calls if hunting the long neck canadas, lots of Canada calls sound like a snow goose with a cold.
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Last edited by Dick284; 09-26-2023 at 04:28 PM.
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Old 09-26-2023, 08:27 PM
SouthWestRanger SouthWestRanger is offline
 
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I almost exclusively hunt water for ducks which puts me apart from most I think. If Iím only hunting ducks, 3 dozen floaters of which 2 dozen are mallards, 1 dozen are wigeon or teal depending on time of year and birds around. I also have 2 spinning wing mojos and I use an A frame blind in the reeds or on a shaded bank and brushed in. If there are geese around I may lose the mojos and add a dozen or two dozen floaters of whatever species I am seeing on the water. 80% of the time Iím hunting ducks and will just turn off the mojos once I shoot my limit if I want to shoot some geese before the day is done. I call for ducks but am not that great of a goose caller so I usually donít target them as heavy.
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Old 09-26-2023, 09:01 PM
elkhunter11 elkhunter11 is online now
 
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If you are where the geese want to be, 3-4 dozen goose shells will bring in Canadas, and smaller groups of specs, add a mallard mojo, and that brings in various species of ducks, just shut off the mojo when Canada geese approach. If you are in the right place, with a good set up, calling is the least important factor. I will wave a goose flag and use a goose call to attract geese, at distance, and when they get close I put both away, and the priority is not moving in the blind.
The number one priority is scouting, and finding out where the birds want to be,
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Old 09-26-2023, 09:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkhunter11 View Post
If you are where the geese want to be, 3-4 dozen goose shells will bring in Canadas, and smaller groups of specs, add a mallard mojo, and that brings in various species of ducks, just shut off the mojo when Canada geese approach. If you are in the right place, with a good set up, calling is the least important factor. I will wave a goose flag and use a goose call to attract geese, at distance, and when they get close I put both away, and the priority is not moving in the blind.
The number one priority is scouting, and finding out where the birds want to be,
Agreed. Set up a proper spread and no need for calling
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Old 09-26-2023, 09:57 PM
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DiabeticKripple DiabeticKripple is offline
 
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I am by no means an expert, but my buddy who hunts a lot of waterfowl said a bad caller is worse than no calls.

He typically only calls when the ducks go to a different part of the pond to land on, he would rip on the call to try and keep them in the air. Worked a couple times and one group circled back and decoyed into our spread.
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Old 09-26-2023, 11:11 PM
hippietrekker hippietrekker is offline
 
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I am by no means a well established waterfowl hunter - although I will say I quite enjoy a good duck hunt.
I am not versed in field hunting, I have done some pothole hunting, mostly in southern Saskatchewan, here at home I am hunting lakes from my canoe. I target mostly puddle ducks and learning how to find success as I stumble through this self guided adventure.
All this to say, in my experience mallard decoys will bring in enough ducks of various species to keep you shooting. I have shot mallards, teal, gadwall, widgeon, pintails, shovelers, and diver ducks under mallard decoys - I only have mallards. I started with a dozen, added a few for extra positions. I am planning on a mojo but havenít done so yet. I have some very base calls and am trying to learn. Some days they work, other times my technique is bad - if the birds donít like it I stop calling.
As for geese, nothing would make me happier than a goose decoying in but this far my few geese floaters havenít done much for me. All my geese have been incidental fly in overs.
I am learning more every time I go out, what has been most helpful for me is trying to read the birds. Did they flare at my call? Are they landing outside my spread? I am trying to learn something every time I go out.
Good luck! Waterfowl hunting is quickly becoming one of my favourite things, I hope you find success in your adventure!
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  #8  
Old 09-27-2023, 03:59 PM
Macdrizzle Macdrizzle is offline
 
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Looks like I'll start with some canada geese sill. decoys. Maybe later on I'll invest in some mallard floaters if I can get a place to store them.

I'm going to be hunting solo this season. Is there a specific layout blind anyone can recommend? Pros/Cons? Looking to head out this weekend to buy gear.

Thanks for all the tips. Really good read
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Old 09-28-2023, 08:26 AM
MyAlberta MyAlberta is offline
 
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For beginners, and especially soloists, Iíd recommend going light. A half dozen floater mallards will give you action, when appropriately applied.
Every bird species has their characteristics, which you as a hunter try to leverage. The greatest part of hunting for me was in learning those traits and figuring out when and where certain techniques made sense. Whenever you are out hunting, take a broader look around. When do the birds move about, what routes do they prefer, what species prefer what environments. When and where would decoys make sense. It can be a life long journey.
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Old 09-28-2023, 08:43 AM
densa44 densa44 is offline
 
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Default A dog?

I.m not going to add to the experts, you are getting good advice.

If you are hunting ducks over water you need a dog. This is my own experoence, many ears ago I was hunting ducks on lake Erie with an off shore wind and I shot 12 and retrieved 6. This was so wrong that I got a dog right away, joined the Niagra Peninsula Retrieving club, and 60 years on I'm still holding a leash.

BTW I get everything that I shoot and lots of cripples that others shoot and don't retrieve. If you get a dog there is lots of excellent help here in Alberta.
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Old 09-28-2023, 08:53 AM
elkhunter11 elkhunter11 is online now
 
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If you plan on hunting ducks, a mojo will usually attract more than a dozen duck decoys, and it costs no more, and it takes up less room. You can use it in a field or on the shore of a pond, or even in shallow water. I don't own a duck decoy, other than the mojo, and none of us bring duck decoys, for our combo hunts.
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Old 09-28-2023, 09:00 AM
Smoky buck Smoky buck is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by densa44 View Post
I.m not going to add to the experts, you are getting good advice.

If you are hunting ducks over water you need a dog. This is my own experoence, many ears ago I was hunting ducks on lake Erie with an off shore wind and I shot 12 and retrieved 6. This was so wrong that I got a dog right away, joined the Niagra Peninsula Retrieving club, and 60 years on I'm still holding a leash.

BTW I get everything that I shoot and lots of cripples that others shoot and don't retrieve. If you get a dog there is lots of excellent help here in Alberta.
A dog is extremely valuable and opens up the ability to hunt water that you could not hunt otherwise. A dog will definitely improve your odds on tough recoveries with cripples

But fact of the matter is if you are hunting shallow water that is easy to wade or a form of boat in the correct waters you should not loose cripples. I have hunted over water without a dog many many times and had no issues recovering birds. I have actually lost more ducks to tall marsh grass and cattails where a dog would have be a big difference than I have do to water. Very rarely I have lost a cripple
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