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  #31  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:27 PM
raab raab is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Prairiewolf View Post
Weird, got mine on Amazon and I didn't wait that long. I didn't have a Prime membership either.

If you're really worried, order with the Prime trial period, then cancel the trial.
Are these the Bino's you got? Maybe I'll go that way and save the 100 bucks over the Nikon's. Give me a bigger kitty for my spotter.

https://www.amazon.ca/Vanguard-Endea.../dp/B005DQG5XC

Looks like I can get the binos right away, but not the spotter by vanguard.
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  #32  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:34 PM
raab raab is offline
 
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Whats about these Carson Binoculars? Anyone used them. Seem to be getting good reviews.

https://www.amazon.ca/Carson-Definit...ies+binoculars

The hard part with Amazon is you can't look through them before you buy.
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  #33  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:40 PM
Mountain Guy Mountain Guy is offline
 
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Originally Posted by raab View Post
Thanks, I know its more likely I get in a car crash then have problems in the mountains. Still doesn't mean Im comfortable with the idea of Yogi crunching on my skull. haha I like your thought pattern though, that yogi better run. I'll be carrying a 30-06, a 4" buck knife, bear spray, and most likely bear bangers. I can most definitely screw up any bear who wants to mess with me.
Sounds like you have a healthy respect for bears...which is a good thing. But be careful not to be paranoid. You won't enjoy your trip if your over thinking getting eaten by a bear. Be cognizant that they share the same space as you, try not to surprise one by keeping your presence known and you'll more than likely only encounter one from a distance.
Saying that...as far as your comment about screwing up the bear. YOu might want to rethink that. I think the opposite. If the bear wants to screw you up your done.

Last edited by Mountain Guy; 06-13-2018 at 08:46 PM.
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  #34  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:59 PM
raab raab is offline
 
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Also curious what you guys thing of these Cabelas 10x42's?
They come with ED glass which is surprising for the cost.

https://www.cabelas.ca/product/92217...-hd-binoculars
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  #35  
Old 06-13-2018, 09:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Mountain Guy View Post
Sounds like you have a healthy respect for bears...which is a good thing. But be careful not to be paranoid. You won't enjoy your trip if your over thinking getting eaten by a bear. Be cognizant that they share the same space as you, try not to surprise one by keeping your presence known and you'll more than likely only encounter one from a distance.
Saying that...as far as your comment about screwing up the bear. YOu might want to rethink that. I think the opposite. If the bear wants to screw you up your done.
Yep definitely have a healthy respect for them. Ive dealt with black bears and find they're mostly wimps. Not sure the same can be said about the Grizzlies. I guess Ill find out later this summer. As long as I take precautions, and be vigilant I dont expect any problems. I know most Grizzly attacks are provoked and not predatory in nature. In saying that still a mind game going out on your own, in grizzly country.
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  #36  
Old 06-13-2018, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by -JR- View Post
Was it like last year or the year before that guys were saying you have to carry as much as you can in your high end back pack when sheep hunting ?
I was a avid sheep hunter back in the 80s-90s .Went out almost every weekend and some one week trips. solo hunts and with partners.
If it did not fit in my pocket it did not come with me.....Boy did I get shot down on this site.
Carried my ram out holding the horns .If I had a back pack ,chance are I would not have walked up to that farther saddle to spot that Ram.
If you want a Ram go light .
Yup you get it! Hauled stuff out in my hands as well lol I didn't have top end equipment like they do today and I still don't.
Guess I don't know how to hunt sheep!
My one thing I would suggest is a real good set of rain gear. You do not dry off fast in the mountains or at all. Everything stays wet. Best not to get wet to start.
Spotters may be great to spot stuff a long ways away but your binos will tell you if it is worth a closer look or not. If you see sheep you should probably head that way anyways..... but again what do I know
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  #37  
Old 06-13-2018, 11:25 PM
mattthegorby mattthegorby is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountain Guy View Post
Sounds like you have a healthy respect for bears...which is a good thing. But be careful not to be paranoid. You won't enjoy your trip if your over thinking getting eaten by a bear. Be cognizant that they share the same space as you, try not to surprise one by keeping your presence known and you'll more than likely only encounter one from a distance.
Saying that...as far as your comment about screwing up the bear. YOu might want to rethink that. I think the opposite. If the bear wants to screw you up your done.
This is great bear advice!

An afternoon of reading on the internet can really give one the heebie jeebies. I take bears very seriously, even blacks, and take all the precautions. However, one needs to keep the risk in perspective.
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  #38  
Old 06-14-2018, 07:38 AM
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i see the advice on skipping the spotter for sure, i'd happily do that with some judging experience and confidence, also see the recommendation for a spotter, especially for new sheep hunter, clearly it's not a necessity as some consistent ram killers don't bother

could need confirmation about the cabelas binoculars, understand they may be made by meopta, haven't heard bad things about either

i run leica ultravid hd's and they are the shizzle, i keep trying lesser bino's with great reputations for the money but keep coming back to the ultravid hd's...so worth it to me

and whoever said get those 10x on the tripod? YES TIMES 10!!! when i started hard mounting the bino's the amount of game i found increased big time, great thing to add to this thread, for other stuff i have window mount also, deer, scouting etc. Game changer imo!
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  #39  
Old 06-14-2018, 05:30 PM
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Got to take some of these comments in context.

You could hunt Cadomin everyday and live out of the motel there or camper, just climb the hills each day or glass from the road or you could be hiking in 10 or 20 miles off the trail and living out of what you carry for ten plus days. Thats pretty tough to do living out of what you can carry in your pockets I think and I wouldn't recommend it. However you are going about it, make sure have the gear to make it in weather conditions that the mountains can dish out. Add a silitarp and a bunch of paracord to your kit and pack it with you. At least you can stay dry if you get caught out. Check out some gear lists on here as well, and lots of good advice in old threads.
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  #40  
Old 06-14-2018, 06:20 PM
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Get the best optics you can afford. If you are young get even better ones as you have a long life ahead of you. I bought Monarchs because they are not bad, I'm cheap, and over 60. I like the spotting scope because it has saved me many hours and kms of walking, but mine is fixed 48 power and small.
Two packs out means 3 days packing - one out, one in (after a hearty meal) and one out again.
If you plan on being successful, learn to properly cape an animal and I mean totally fleshed out and salted - no extra bone, meat, skin, cartilage, or water. Packing a pound of salt in can save you many pounds packed out.
Oh, the best thing you can bring to lighten your pack is a knowledgable sheep hunter.
Good luck and hoe you are successful.
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  #41  
Old 06-14-2018, 10:14 PM
-JR- -JR- is offline
 
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Originally Posted by nube View Post
Yup you get it! Hauled stuff out in my hands as well lol I didn't have top end equipment like they do today and I still don't.
Guess I don't know how to hunt sheep!
My one thing I would suggest is a real good set of rain gear. You do not dry off fast in the mountains or at all. Everything stays wet. Best not to get wet to start.
Spotters may be great to spot stuff a long ways away but your binos will tell you if it is worth a closer look or not. If you see sheep you should probably head that way anyways..... but again what do I know
One thing I always say I guy should bring is ear plugs. As the wind is aways howling. But what do I know.
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  #42  
Old 06-14-2018, 11:16 PM
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Originally Posted by raab View Post
Thanks for the advice. I wont be scared to carry just bino's this year, and I wont shoot to small of Sheep because of it. Only reason I want a spotting scope is so I wont have to walk a mile to see if a Ram is legal. If I can't afford the spotting scope, Ill still be going out.

My next question is how do you guys deal with the psychological part? Im heading into an area apparently packed with Grizzlies as they share similar habitat to Sheep. How do I get around the mental aspects of a solo mountain hunt? Especially considering this place has a large confirmed Grizzly population?
I agree with not needing a spotting scope for big horns they are more important for thin horn sheep to age short rams. A good pair of 10 power binoculars is good enough. If you spot a ram a mile away itís always a good idea to close the distance and check every hole, ridge, crevice and behind every tree for his buddies anyway.
The best way to not worry about bears is to not worry about them and enjoy your outdoor experience. Carry bear spray, and stay alert when your out. A spot locator or something similar is a confidence builder also. When in camp donít leave things out that will attract them and cache your food if you can.
Be prepared to spend a night on the mountain if you have to go the extra mile to get your sheep. Something to start a fire, rain gear, food to keep your core temp up and water keep hydrated.
You donít have to be comfortable just alive.
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  #43  
Old 06-14-2018, 11:37 PM
Mountain Guy Mountain Guy is offline
 
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Originally Posted by raab View Post
Yep definitely have a healthy respect for them. Ive dealt with black bears and find they're mostly wimps. Not sure the same can be said about the Grizzlies. I guess Ill find out later this summer. As long as I take precautions, and be vigilant I dont expect any problems. I know most Grizzly attacks are provoked and not predatory in nature. In saying that still a mind game going out on your own, in grizzly country.
I agree. Never feared blacks. Have had a few close encounters but never worried. Always felt like I could punch them in the nose and beat them up.

These guys on the other hand ... hard to feel the love
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  #44  
Old 06-15-2018, 08:49 AM
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sure does open eyes to threads about best backpacks for hauling loads when there are guys chasing sheep not even carrying a backpack....that's awesome lol

liking my osprey xenith 88 more and more lol, for day hunts it's just a minimalist kill kit and some rain gear really, in a scrunched up pack which can open up to swallow a sheep in case i knock one down, but can also load it up for a week and go play too...sure don't need it for day trips but it doesn't weigh much to begin with, can't imagine going san's pack but it'll sure perspective what i put in it for day trips, right on
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  #45  
Old 06-15-2018, 09:01 AM
Big Grey Wolf Big Grey Wolf is offline
 
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Mountain Man, yes most blacks are not a problem, however almost same number of people have been killed. by blacks as by grizz. Just ask 30-40 people at Liard hot springs when predatory black bear started killing people one after the other.
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  #46  
Old 06-16-2018, 12:25 AM
rk4 rk4 is offline
 
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Filling your pockets? No spotting scope? Seriously? What sort advice is that to give a guy whoís never hunted sheep before? Thatís some pretty backwards thinking. I believe some of the guys who say theyíve done it, but thatís not how youíre gunna learn to hunt sheep. You can get away with cutting a few corners once youíre comfortable and and understand what youíre doing, but until then skimping out on gear is gunna get you in trouble.

Please donít do something stupid and go into the mountains your first hunt without a backpack or a spotting scope. That and a rifle are the three most important items youíre gunna need. Everyone is gunna have theyíre own opinions but I can not possibly see an upside too leaving any of those behind, I just canít understand it. If you canít afford a spotting scope either borrow one or wait till you can afford one. Sell your Binos and buy a spotting scope if need be, Iíd leave my binos before Iíd ever consider not being a spotting scope. And I donít even get started on how ridiculous an idea it is to carry a ram without a back pack.

Not trying to offend anyone here, Just giving what a feel is responsible advice to a green sheep hunter looking for opinions.

Good luck my friend
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  #47  
Old 06-16-2018, 12:34 AM
rk4 rk4 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Mountain Guy View Post
I agree. Never feared blacks. Have had a few close encounters but never worried. Always felt like I could punch them in the nose and beat them up.

These guys on the other hand ... hard to feel the love
Wow, youíre not really serious Iím guessing? If a black bear choose too, you would be dead.
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  #48  
Old 06-16-2018, 12:44 AM
raab raab is offline
 
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Wow, youíre not really serious Iím guessing? If a black bear choose too, you would be dead.
He's probably like me where you almost get used to them. We had them in town or on the job sites all the time and no issues. Ditto when out hunting. Just haven't been around enough Grizzly to be comfortable yet.
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  #49  
Old 06-16-2018, 12:47 AM
raab raab is offline
 
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Originally Posted by rk4 View Post
Filling your pockets? No spotting scope? Seriously? What sort advice is that to give a guy whoís never hunted sheep before? Thatís some pretty backwards thinking. I believe some of the guys who say theyíve done it, but thatís not how youíre gunna learn to hunt sheep. You can get away with cutting a few corners once youíre comfortable and and understand what youíre doing, but until then skimping out on gear is gunna get you in trouble.

Please donít do something stupid and go into the mountains your first hunt without a backpack or a spotting scope. That and a rifle are the three most important items youíre gunna need. Everyone is gunna have theyíre own opinions but I can not possibly see an upside too leaving any of those behind, I just canít understand it. If you canít afford a spotting scope either borrow one or wait till you can afford one. Sell your Binos and buy a spotting scope if need be, Iíd leave my binos before Iíd ever consider not being a spotting scope. And I donít even get started on how ridiculous an idea it is to carry a ram without a back pack.

Not trying to offend anyone here, Just giving what a feel is responsible advice to a green sheep hunter looking for opinions.

Good luck my friend
Well now I'm confused, was going to buy some Vortex Viper HD binos tomorrow. Now you're saying to buy a spotter instead of the bino's.
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  #50  
Old 06-16-2018, 03:20 AM
sillyak sillyak is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Stinky Coyote View Post
i see the advice on skipping the spotter for sure, i'd happily do that with some judging experience and confidence, also see the recommendation for a spotter, especially for new sheep hunter, clearly it's not a necessity as some consistent ram killers don't bother

could need confirmation about the cabelas binoculars, understand they may be made by meopta, haven't heard bad things about either

i run leica ultravid hd's and they are the shizzle, i keep trying lesser bino's with great reputations for the money but keep coming back to the ultravid hd's...so worth it to me

and whoever said get those 10x on the tripod? YES TIMES 10!!! when i started hard mounting the bino's the amount of game i found increased big time, great thing to add to this thread, for other stuff i have window mount also, deer, scouting etc. Game changer imo!


The Cabela's Euro HD binos are rebadged Meopta Meostar, Made In Czech Republic. I doubt those cheaper Cabelas binos are Made by Meopta. Yes, the Meostar or Euro HD are fantastic binos. Very similair to Swaro SLC HD in many ways at a lower price point. Not quite Swaro EL SV level though.

I wrote a very long winded review here:

http://www.outdoorsmenforum.ca/showthread.php?t=288544

As for binos vs spotting scope; for me it is emphatically binoculars. It find it much more comfortable to glass for long periods of time with two eyes instead of one. Although a spotting scope is necessary to IMO to inspect in detail something without having to walk closer.
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  #51  
Old 06-16-2018, 07:17 AM
sillyak sillyak is offline
 
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Also, I wouldn't get too worked up over HD marketing when it comes to binos or spotting scopes.

HD or ED marketing in optics means extra low dispersion glass. When light travels through glass the different wavelengths of light refract in different amounts so different colours focus at different points. This means when you focus on something, the far ends of the spectrum (Red and Purple) are not in good focus (chromatic aberation). This leads to the purple and orange fringes seen around bright objects and reduced sharpness over the whole image.

ED glass helps greatly to correct this and allows all wavelengths to come to sharp focus at a similair point (no glass is perfect, but some are pretty darn close).

However not all ED glass is created equal. FPL 51, 53 and 55, FCD 100, FK-61, real Fluorite crystal ect. are all marketed as "ED" and some are definitely better than others. Also, optical design plays a huge role in colour correction (the best glass in the world isn't overly good if the design isn't up to snuff or if other glass components like the prisim or eyepiece are inferior.) Remember the ED element is a single piece of glass in the objective. There are minimum 5 glass elements per side, it's not just the one ED element that matters. Mechanics also play a huge part in binoculars quality.

So in short: ED glass is great, but it's not everything. Test as many pairs of binoculars as much as possible before buying; and don't commit yourself to a pair based on marketing.
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  #52  
Old 06-16-2018, 07:30 AM
foothills26 foothills26 is offline
 
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In my very limited experience I find myself using my binos way more and only really dig the spotting scope out when I want a closer look at something. I started out with a low end vortex spotter and some bushnell binos and have since upgraded the binos over upgrading the spotter. I havenít been chasing sheep very long but so far thatís what has been working for me.
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  #53  
Old 06-16-2018, 07:49 AM
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This is my gear list for an extended multi day trip. Of course if you are day hunting this is way over kill. There are a few essentials I wouldn't day hunt without, clothing/rain gear, siltarp/paracord, 3l water, headlamp, knife, lighters and optics.

Gear list

Pack
Black tape small roll
Spot me w lithium batteries
Hiking pole 1
Knife, havalon and a few spare blades
Parachute chord
Head lamp w lithium batteries
Gps w lithium batteries(optional) and compass
Topo map(optional)
Three small bic lighters
Optics, tripod
Lens cloth or paper
Camera
Hammond game getter and a few loads(optional)
Game bag
Garbage bags
Small sunscreen/chap stick
Medication if needed
Dental floss
Toothbrush
Toothpaste, small
Two or three j cloths and small soap
Tp
Ear plugs for shooting /snoring partners
Wide brim hat
Toque
Gloves or mitts
Gun and 6-8 rounds
Stove and fuel/optional
Pot, cup/bowl, spoon, titanium
Water bottles, 3 litres
Sleeping bag and compression sack
Therma rest
Tent/with siltarp if two people
Light shoe such as a Croc if I know there is lots of water to cross(optional)
Ski goggles for extreme winds late season in snow(optional)
Down coat and rain gear
Fleece jacket
Extra socks smart wool
Merino wool base layer
Light hiking pants, early season
Wool pants, late season
Hanwag Alaskan gtx boots
Salt depending how far in I am(optional)
Grub, mtn house, oatmeal, raisins, g bars, dehy spuds, jerky, almonds, flax meal, dry meat, dry fruit
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  #54  
Old 06-16-2018, 09:25 AM
raab raab is offline
 
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So Sillyak, do you think the Vortex Diamondbacks would be fine? I could see a slight difference on the edges between the DB's and Vipers HD's, but I feel th DB's were very good glass for the price. There's close to 400 dollar difference between the two.
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  #55  
Old 06-16-2018, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rk4 View Post
Filling your pockets? No spotting scope? Seriously? What sort advice is that to give a guy whoís never hunted sheep before? Thatís some pretty backwards thinking. I believe some of the guys who say theyíve done it, but thatís not how youíre gunna learn to hunt sheep. You can get away with cutting a few corners once youíre comfortable and and understand what youíre doing, but until then skimping out on gear is gunna get you in trouble.

Please donít do something stupid and go into the mountains your first hunt without a backpack or a spotting scope. That and a rifle are the three most important items youíre gunna need. Everyone is gunna have theyíre own opinions but I can not possibly see an upside too leaving any of those behind, I just canít understand it. If you canít afford a spotting scope either borrow one or wait till you can afford one. Sell your Binos and buy a spotting scope if need be, Iíd leave my binos before Iíd ever consider not being a spotting scope. And I donít even get started on how ridiculous an idea it is to carry a ram without a back pack.

Not trying to offend anyone here, Just giving what a feel is responsible advice to a green sheep hunter looking for opinions.

Good luck my friend
That's a little negative. I hunted sheep for years without one. People hunted sheep for a century with 30-30's, no binoculars. Over half the sheep I've seen shot back when I hunted sheep the spotting scope never got out of the pack. I wouldn't stay home because I didn't have a spotting scope. Personally I think binos are the more important tool.
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  #56  
Old 06-16-2018, 10:48 AM
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I'm surprised that a first aid kit and the knowledge required to use it don't get mentioned too often.
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  #57  
Old 06-16-2018, 11:44 AM
rk4 rk4 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Bushrat View Post
That's a little negative. I hunted sheep for years without one. People hunted sheep for a century with 30-30's, no binoculars. Over half the sheep I've seen shot back when I hunted sheep the spotting scope never got out of the pack. I wouldn't stay home because I didn't have a spotting scope. Personally I think binos are the more important tool.
I donít think Iím being negative, at least Iím not trying to be. Yeah well things were a lot different back in the day. Itís not the same game anymore. To me it just isnít realistic to start hunting sheep without a spotting scope. You must of killed some monster sheep if you arenít even bothering to double check legality with a scope. I personally find more Rams with a scope than binos, about 4 to 1. Thatís just me though. I can cover way more country in a day sitting down with a spotting scope than anyone can with binos. Youíll be doing a whole hiking if you donít carry a scope. Scope can save you a whole 2 days of hiking in lots of cases.

Everybody in this province has an equal right to hunt sheep, thatís without a doubt. But if you arenít fully prepared to hunt sheep responsibly than wait till you are ready. Carrying a spotting scope so you can accurately judge a ram is your responsibility, at least until you feel comfortable enough that I guess you decide you donít need one? Not trying to insult anyone who hunts that way successfuly, Iíve just honestly never heard of that.

Hunting sheep is becoming more and more popular now a days so letís try starting the new guys off in a position to succeed, where they arenít going to be making mistakes do to advice like ďitís good enough for me! Itís good enough for you!Ē.

If you want to start hunting sheep than commit. Donít half ass it. If you want to half ass it just stay home.
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  #58  
Old 06-16-2018, 02:38 PM
nube nube is offline
 
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RK4 sounds like you have hunted sheep a lot. I'd love to see some pics of your rams? Got any big ones to share with us?
A lot of this comes down to how you hunt and what the terrain is I guess. Also depends on what you got to do to get into sheep country. When I hunted Wilmore I had horses and took a scope. Didn't use it a ton at all. I would spend time needed to check a valley over and then off I went over the next hill to check it out till daylight was done. If anything had decent curl and looked promising I went in to the stalk whether it was legal or not and usually found the odd ram hiding off on it's own or run into a few others in between.
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  #59  
Old 06-16-2018, 03:11 PM
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Bushrat Bushrat is offline
 
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Originally Posted by rk4 View Post
You must of killed some monster sheep if you arenít even bothering to double check legality with a scope.

Everybody in this province has an equal right to hunt sheep, thatís without a doubt. But if you arenít fully prepared to hunt sheep responsibly than wait till you are ready. Carrying a spotting scope so you can accurately judge a ram is your responsibility, at least until you feel comfortable enough that I guess you decide you donít need one? Not trying to insult anyone who hunts that way successfuly, Iíve just honestly never heard of that.

Hunting sheep is becoming more and more popular now a days so letís try starting the new guys off in a position to succeed, where they arenít going to be making mistakes do to advice like ďitís good enough for me! Itís good enough for you!Ē.

If you want to start hunting sheep than commit. Donít half ass it. If you want to half ass it just stay home.
Never was much interested in barely legal squeekers where you had to squint down to the millimeter from 34 different angles for 2 hours to see if it's legal. Anyways I think guys shooting short sheep are shooting them because they don't know how to judge horns, spotting scope or not.

Telling someone to stay off the mountain because they don't commit to the very best equipment is like telling a new fly fisherman he may as well stay off the river unless he has a $1200 fly rod, $700 reel and $800 waders.

Of course having a spotting scope is an advantage, you might miss seeing a few sheep or stalk up to one a 10 hr hike away and find it isn't legal sure, but that happens to guys with spotting scopes who see a ram two days hike away and find its not legal when they get there. If you don't have one it is no reason to not hunt sheep. You still have a good chance to be successful, you learn things about sheep and gain experience as you go. Collect or improve gear over time when you can afford it. Go on shorter day hunts closer to roads if you haven't got all the gear, it's all good experience.

I doubt anybody is stupid enough to go on a week long hunt in sheep country with nothing but a banana and an handful of nuts in their pocket. Most hardcore sheep nuts also carry binos, knife, bottle of water and some poptarts if they're really going deep.
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  #60  
Old 06-16-2018, 03:23 PM
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bdub bdub is offline
 
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Originally Posted by grouse_hunter View Post
I'm surprised that a first aid kit and the knowledge required to use it don't get mentioned too often.
My basic first aid kit is black tape and tp along with heavy duty pain killers, some milder stuff/ibuprofen, some cold meds, antibiotics, temporary dentel filling material and a safety pin for slivers.
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