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  #91  
Old 01-06-2023, 11:44 AM
marky_mark marky_mark is offline
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Rinella is basically the only one I will watch. If ever there is any type of emoji in a post of mine it means I have a big smile on my face and it is light hearted.

This is social media and I obviously enjoy it, but I follow Shockley on Facebook and the rude sht that people say to that mean as heís nursing his wife through cancer is beyond belief.

Social media can be good or bad. Overall, in terms of hunting, the jury is definitely out.
There is always a hater and on social media These people have a voice
Alot of people just see the end result
For example shockey hunting all over the world, owning a outfit in the yukon and on the island
What they donít see is what he had to do to get there
People forget that he grew up in a trailer park in Saskatchewan
He made everything that he has from his own hard work

I like Billy molls and I know a few guys who have hunted with him and say he is a great guy
his shows are really good
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  #92  
Old 01-06-2023, 12:23 PM
The Elkster The Elkster is offline
 
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IMO Best hunting shows now are youtube channels with average joe non-sponsored folk generally hunting public land. Gotta weed through some bad editing but it's worth it. These guys are the most relevant to the average joe and their shows don't consist of commercials interrupted by the odd bit of hunting. Often they show a good mix of getting to the spot, camping in the backcountry, equipment ideas and money savers, breakdowns and other sh!t that just happens and is relatable. They also aren't scared to show the blanks and I've seen a few tears shed after bagging a regal animal...ie respect for the animal and the hard work it took to get him.

I just don't relate to flying in on a private jet and having a guy lead me to an animal...and let's not forget the mega thousands in gear these "hunters" sport. Guided canned hunt...these guys would have been just as successful with an old bolt action 270 with basic fixed power scope and a pair of jeans and a T-shirt LOL. But they sell a lot of overpriced gear to suckers so who am I to question.

On the topic of eating coyote and wolf...why not? Cougar is supposed to be delicious and eats basically the same diet. Parasites are the only thing I can think of and are easily killed with proper cooking. I find it odd how people build up these taboo's in their mind. Steve does a good job to try to dispell those and promotes using as much of the animal as possible and that is good thing! Hunters should be making the most of any animal they take. Probably one of the most positive things to win favor with the non-hunting voters as well.
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  #93  
Old 01-06-2023, 12:47 PM
ehrgeiz ehrgeiz is offline
 
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I watch many moms at the park or snow hill who only take their kids there to pose for the obligatory selfie and corresponding social media post (#momlife #bestlife). Then proceed to ignore their kids and continue searching for gratification from strangers on some new phone application.

We have an entire generation incoming who's sense of value is derived from their online presence and who are constantly acting in response to feelings of envy.

It's way beyond hijacking hunting culture, it's a societal level cancer permeating everything and I don't see any cure coming. Whatever people can do, even if structurally harmful, many will do.

As far as the uptick in hunters. As others have mentioned, it's good and bad. Sucks to run into more guys out there hunting, but you need numbers to have a voice in politics. There are many out there who would like to see non-indigenous hunting opportunities eroded and eventually eliminated. They'll eventually succeed if our numbers dwindle.

That to me is a bigger concern, and let's be honest with the exception of sheep country sometimes, if you are off the roads in the boreal or foothills, down the cut line or certainly in the bush you don't see many other hunters. There is a lot of land to hunt in Alberta.
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  #94  
Old 01-06-2023, 01:58 PM
raab raab is offline
 
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Thereís some pretty good shows on YouTube now for hunting. I enjoy Randy Newberg and the stuff from GoHunt. Seem like normal hunting trips to me, and a good story usually. Whether thatís getting people involved in the sport or not I donít know.

In saying that more hunters is better for all of us, along with firearms owners. The bigger the group the more pull we will have politically where we could see new opportunities emerge like the Grizzly hunt or looser gun control laws. With a larger group weíd also see more companies popping up to support the sport which will advance the gear we use. It may also result in more rifle ranges being built. Something sorely lacking in Alberta is long rifle ranges where you can shoot to 1000yards.

Just my 2 cents but as hunters I believe we should be trying to get more people into hunting. Not trying to block them from entering and hoping weíll protect our own opportunities. If our group gets small enough, make no mistake hunting will be done.

Kind of a side post, but had to respond to the guys who are saying thereís too many hunters on public land. Iím lucky to see a hunter once Iím off the road and hiking. Also Covid numbers skew things, as many people werenít able to travel so used their vacation time to go hunting.
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  #95  
Old 01-06-2023, 02:57 PM
Pekan Pekan is offline
 
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Originally Posted by raab View Post
Thereís some pretty good shows on YouTube now for hunting. I enjoy Randy Newberg and the stuff from GoHunt. Seem like normal hunting trips to me, and a good story usually. Whether thatís getting people involved in the sport or not I donít know.

In saying that more hunters is better for all of us, along with firearms owners. The bigger the group the more pull we will have politically where we could see new opportunities emerge like the Grizzly hunt or looser gun control laws. With a larger group weíd also see more companies popping up to support the sport which will advance the gear we use. It may also result in more rifle ranges being built. Something sorely lacking in Alberta is long rifle ranges where you can shoot to 1000yards.

Just my 2 cents but as hunters I believe we should be trying to get more people into hunting. Not trying to block them from entering and hoping weíll protect our own opportunities. If our group gets small enough, make no mistake hunting will be done.

Kind of a side post, but had to respond to the guys who are saying thereís too many hunters on public land. Iím lucky to see a hunter once Iím off the road and hiking. Also Covid numbers skew things, as many people werenít able to travel so used their vacation time to go hunting.
Not all public land is the same. You might be able to hike off the road and not see anyone, but in the southwest part of the province within 90 minutes of Calgary, it can get busy. Even km's from the road. People are willing to work harder for an elk. If a person's out for a whitetail that's easier to get away from the crowds.
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  #96  
Old 01-06-2023, 03:07 PM
JD848 JD848 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by marky_mark View Post
There is always a hater and on social media These people have a voice
Alot of people just see the end result
For example shockey hunting all over the world, owning a outfit in the yukon and on the island
What they donít see is what he had to do to get there
People forget that he grew up in a trailer park in Saskatchewan
He made everything that he has from his own hard work

I like Billy molls and I know a few guys who have hunted with him and say he is a great guy
his shows are really good
x10 Mark you are very correct ,way to much hatred and jealousy .Jim is the real deal plus I didn't know his wife was very ill, very sorry to hear this. I watch very little in outdoor shows or hunting, But Billy Molls is one guy that I do watch the odd time.

Were sitting here debating about how bad it's getting for hunting , but this whole deal we worry about is minor compared to what younger kids are reading and falling prey to .

I urge all parents to keep a sharp eye on what there child is doing online and who and why they are connected to people who may cause them serious harm in more ways then we every thought possible. Your the adult ,there the child. Protecting them is your job whether they like it or not.

Sorry for the derailment ,but there the future in our hunting society .

Cheers
JD
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  #97  
Old 01-06-2023, 03:26 PM
raab raab is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Pekan View Post
Not all public land is the same. You might be able to hike off the road and not see anyone, but in the southwest part of the province within 90 minutes of Calgary, it can get busy. Even km's from the road. People are willing to work harder for an elk. If a person's out for a whitetail that's easier to get away from the crowds.
That part of the province is busy for everything not just hunting. Elk is on draw in most of those WMU's and it's a low probability hunt in the mountains with most zones between 5-10% success rate. For comparison a sheep hunt has a 4% success rate.

If you can get private land access east of the mountains. That area seems like it'd be good elk hunting, and most private landowners will only let a certain amount of hunters on their land.
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  #98  
Old 01-06-2023, 07:02 PM
SerenityNow SerenityNow is offline
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All publicity is good publicity.

I am very happy to see renewed interest on hunting and outdoor recreation generally. I don't really care about individual motivation.

People wouldn't complain about hunter numbers if the animals were managed in a competent manner and the hunting opportunities increased with the hunters. But we have absolutely incompetent people with no vision running things and we end up with more hunters and even less opportunities than ever.
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  #99  
Old 01-06-2023, 07:31 PM
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There's some really good outdoor channels on YT, but I like to focus on the diy, down-to-earth guys that have NO ENDORSEMENTS!!

Edit to add: Not a fake moment on any show I've ever seen with any of these guys/gals.

My favorites: these are the channel names.

1. WHAT I DO. Great trapping channel and some of the best diy stuff you'll see, plus he's a local guy and a personal buddy of mine.

2. DJB OUTDOORS. Alberta father, son, wife hunting and they take some of the nicest trophy animals you'll see.

3. STEVE AKA MOOSEMAN. I think this guy might be the single best moose caller that I've watched. Great moose hunting videos.

4. RAISED IN ALASKA. Not local content obviously but the guy lives in a moose paradise and he gets GREAT, EDUCATIONAL, INFORMATIVE videos on live moose. Captures great moose behavior.

5. CHASE & ASHLEY OUTDOORS, husband and wife fishing and hunting in Ontario.

6. BRAD FRY, if you don't know who Brad Fry is then you owe it to yourself to watch his channel. The man is a legend and deservedly so!

7. GRIDLESSNESS. Dad, mum and their daughters, with some mom and pop appearances. Good people living the outdoor life in B.C.

8. HILLDOG TV. Crazy Aussie mate, hardcore deer hunting in the land down under.
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  #100  
Old 01-07-2023, 06:40 AM
Etownpaul Etownpaul is offline
 
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Iím a fan of Brian Callís Gritty series on YouTube. His films are really well done and itís all deep back country hunting. His podcasts are a bit like an infomercial, but I get it, a guy has to pay the bills. Itís nice that he keeps the hunt videos mostly about hunting and leaves the advertising for afterwards.

Billy Molls is awesome too. Itís cool to see how rich people hunt Alaska.

Seems like half the guys in their late 20s early 30s I run into recently got into hunting. Itís good for the sport and fantastic for the used rifle market in 3/4 years.
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  #101  
Old 01-07-2023, 07:51 AM
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Matt Rinella has his own podcast now as well.
Called Hunt Quietly.

Some of the episodes get a little repetitive at times. Also he is firmly entrenched in his opinions, so not a whole lot of room for growth there, but he doesn't seem to mind being challenged by his guests, which is good.

I agree with a few things he says, disagree with others. Some of his guests are chumps but that is also to be expected with a brand new podcast.

Worth a listen for a couple episodes to get a feeling for his thoughts and where he is coming from.

Some of his better guests are Randy Newberg and Aaron Snyder
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  #102  
Old 01-07-2023, 11:28 AM
Chowdowncowtown Chowdowncowtown is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Pekan View Post
Not all public land is the same. You might be able to hike off the road and not see anyone, but in the southwest part of the province within 90 minutes of Calgary, it can get busy. Even km's from the road. People are willing to work harder for an elk. If a person's out for a whitetail that's easier to get away from the crowds.
I'm just trying to get into the sport as an adult based out of Calgary, and it seems like I'm going to have to either drive hours or hike hours to have a reasonable chance at a successful big game hunt without stepping on someone else's spot.

Not really a problem for me, but I can see why some people who have been hunting the same areas for a long time might be frustrated. I've seen the same trend in other outdoor sports that I've been into for longer.
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  #103  
Old 01-07-2023, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Chowdowncowtown View Post
I'm just trying to get into the sport as an adult based out of Calgary, and it seems like I'm going to have to either drive hours or hike hours to have a reasonable chance at a successful big game hunt without stepping on someone else's spot.

Not really a problem for me, but I can see why some people who have been hunting the same areas for a long time might be frustrated. I've seen the same trend in other outdoor sports that I've been into for longer.
We all drive for hours and hike for hours.
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  #104  
Old 01-07-2023, 11:10 PM
Chowdowncowtown Chowdowncowtown is offline
 
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We all drive for hours and hike for hours.
I guess I should have clarified "many hours" lol. I drive a lot of long distances for work so I consider something like 4-5 hours to be a quick drive, vs. the person I was responding to saying "90 minutes outside of Calgary".

Like I said, not a big problem for me, I think a little 8-10 hour trip up north for less crowds and more tag availability is no big deal, but I also understand the frustration of seeing formerly quiet spots overrun with new people.
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  #105  
Old 01-08-2023, 01:23 AM
raab raab is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Chowdowncowtown View Post
I guess I should have clarified "many hours" lol. I drive a lot of long distances for work so I consider something like 4-5 hours to be a quick drive, vs. the person I was responding to saying "90 minutes outside of Calgary".

Like I said, not a big problem for me, I think a little 8-10 hour trip up north for less crowds and more tag availability is no big deal, but I also understand the frustration of seeing formerly quiet spots overrun with new people.
This is a temporary thing with regards to a lot of hunters in spots. Most of the hunters I know are older baby boomers who only have like 10 years of serious backcountry hunting left. If we want hunting to continue we need to get younger people into it IMO.

Also agree on the driving. I have permission on private land close to home, but nothing beats a good hunting trip spending a week in the bush up north or out west.
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  #106  
Old 01-08-2023, 06:46 AM
Smoky buck Smoky buck is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Chowdowncowtown View Post
I'm just trying to get into the sport as an adult based out of Calgary, and it seems like I'm going to have to either drive hours or hike hours to have a reasonable chance at a successful big game hunt without stepping on someone else's spot.

Not really a problem for me, but I can see why some people who have been hunting the same areas for a long time might be frustrated. I've seen the same trend in other outdoor sports that I've been into for longer.
Donít need to drive or hike for hours to get away from others. I have been hiding from other hunters in busy locations in both Alberta and BC successfully for years. I hunt 95% public land too

Itís not hard just donít look for locations the same way as everyone elseís and target different terrain then most. Donít think and act like others basically

One tip majority of hunters think they need to drive and hike farther than everyone else to avoid other hunters

Outside of telling you to think differently than other hunters I am not giving anymore information because I donít want to start running into others lol

As much as hunters want to say there is Hunters everywhere only a small fraction of bush/mountains are being hunted
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  #107  
Old 01-08-2023, 07:16 AM
35 whelen 35 whelen is offline
 
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Donít need to drive or hike for hours to get away from others. I have been hiding from other hunters in busy locations in both Alberta and BC successfully for years. I hunt 95% public land too



Itís not hard just donít look for locations the same way as everyone elseís and target different terrain then most. Donít think and act like others basically



One tip majority of hunters think they need to drive and hike farther than everyone else to avoid other hunters



Outside of telling you to think differently than other hunters I am not giving anymore information because I donít want to start running into others lol



As much as hunters want to say there is Hunters everywhere only a small fraction of bush/mountains are being hunted
Exactly I guided for 5 years off the FTR and we killed most of our moose within a couple hundred yards of the road where everybody was driving past us to get back into the bush

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  #108  
Old 01-08-2023, 09:22 AM
32-40win 32-40win is offline
 
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Considering the population growth in AB in the last 50 yrs, the limited amount of public land and numbers of types of usage on them, land been opened for oilpatch and logging, it is what it is, crowded in some areas. Not nearly like some areas of the US. I suppose if I lived in the US and could afford to hunt 4 states and take an elk or muley in each one, I might do it. May be for turkeys too. They have far better habitat than we do for a lot of things.
Used to watch some hunting shows when I had cable TV, can`t be bothered with them for the most part now that I haven`t, in the last 10-12 yrs. Watched a few to see what people were talking about, haven`t been impressed very much by any of them. They are making a living at it in a lot of cases, more power to them. Some get carried away and get desperate to do stuff to stay in business, and get busted for doing that desperate stuff, some have been around so long they get boring, only so many things and ways to do stuff. Some are hung up on record books, 30 yrs from now, probably nobody will know who they are anyway, so, it means squat in the long run. Lots of younger folk here have little or no knowledge of Jackie Bushman as one example, or maybe Chuck Adams. How many under 40yr olds have watched Bing Crosby etc., shooting birds, etc., old American Sportsman shows, etc., and have a clue who the people back then were.
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  #109  
Old 01-09-2023, 09:51 AM
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MountainTi MountainTi is offline
 
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I like Billy molls and I know a few guys who have hunted with him and say he is a great guy
his shows are really good
X2. Think I've watched everything Billy has done. Brad Fry another favorite. Ben Stourac as well. These guys are down to earth and do a fantastic job at what they do. Even the mountain project is pretty good. Lot of good stuff on youtube. Watched the meateater once, didn't care for it, but that's just me.
Not into someone selling themself and what they do while acting like a knob to do it (not saying Rinella acts like one, but there are a lot that do). Inflated egos do nothing for me
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  #110  
Old 01-09-2023, 11:00 AM
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EZM EZM is offline
 
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Social Media is highly unlikely to change many opinions on a fundamental level where beliefs are based on significant, controversial and important things to a persons perspectives/opinions.

Social Media, however, does a great job influencing insignificant things like marketing, purchasing, branding, etc...

Anything and everything you watch (pro/con) will be viewed from your perspective and reinforced by your fundamental beliefs.

The term "influencer" comes from social media and sets up social engineering, marketing, etc... an influencer will simply be able to make many readers "try a different brand of perfume or cologne" - and that's were it's made some impacts.

Perfume and cologne is minor, insignificant, and uncontroversial product. Trying another brand out because Hollywood Joe Sexy likes it is an easy choice.

Same is true when we see an ad for a specific brand of camo, or a day pack, a pocket knife .... there's a good chance social media entices us to give this brand a try because Alaska Joe Superwoodsman uses it and loves it.

BUT When you look at politics, hunting, guns, the general rule, where people are talking about significant, controversial and major perspectives - Social media won't likely change your fundamental beliefs - but rather simply reinforce your perspectives.

A political ad won't necessarily make you change your vote if you already have a perspective.

A PETA ad won't make you stop eating meat. etc...

Social Media is what it is, and it's here to stay, so we better use it to our best ability and try to at least defend our perspectives. Rinella does a great job at that as far as I'm concerned and I'm happy to have him with us.

Last edited by EZM; 01-09-2023 at 11:15 AM.
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  #111  
Old 01-09-2023, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Smoky buck View Post
Donít need to drive or hike for hours to get away from others. I have been hiding from other hunters in busy locations in both Alberta and BC successfully for years. I hunt 95% public land too

Itís not hard just donít look for locations the same way as everyone elseís and target different terrain then most. Donít think and act like others basically

One tip majority of hunters think they need to drive and hike farther than everyone else to avoid other hunters

Outside of telling you to think differently than other hunters I am not giving anymore information because I donít want to start running into others lol

As much as hunters want to say there is Hunters everywhere only a small fraction of bush/mountains are being hunted
Like at a lake, dad always laughed. The people on this side boat to the other side as the fishing has to be better there while passing the boats coming from the other side to fish where you just came from.


We have also found some sweet spots just off the highways while many beat the muddy roads for km's and km's to get away from everyone. Not saying I have not been that guy who goes way back to get further away. Done both.
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  #112  
Old 01-09-2023, 12:35 PM
Smoky buck Smoky buck is offline
 
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Like at a lake, dad always laughed. The people on this side boat to the other side as the fishing has to be better there while passing the boats coming from the other side to fish where you just came from.


We have also found some sweet spots just off the highways while many beat the muddy roads for km's and km's to get away from everyone. Not saying I have not been that guy who goes way back to get further away. Done both.
Yup done my fair share of hike in hunts as well as shot animals in some of the stupidest places out there. It is nothing about distance itís about being where the animals are
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  #113  
Old 01-09-2023, 01:18 PM
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Yup done my fair share of hike in hunts as well as shot animals in some of the stupidest places out there. It is nothing about distance itís about being where the animals are
That's 100% true - and good judgment is a key factor in where you hunt, and ultimately harvest and animal.

I have hunted with relatives who have hiked through the nastiest bush and deep snow miles and miles from the road and killed an animal (Moose in this case) at 4PM.

We finished getting the last 2 quarters back at 8AM the next day.

Sometimes thinking about a harvest and recovery plan determine how close "to the road" you should hunt. weather is also important - if it's warm, you don't want your meat out there for a day or two before it gets cooled off properly.

Alternately, if you can get equipment deep back in the bush to recover the animal you have more leway to go a bit deeper.
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  #114  
Old 01-09-2023, 06:50 PM
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Social Media is highly unlikely to change many opinions on a fundamental level where beliefs are based on significant, controversial and important things to a persons perspectives/opinions.
True if you've grown up and developed your perspectives with decent mentors and parents. On the other hand many young people get or have gotten a lot of their ideology and notions in their formative and teen years on into adulthood from social and woke media, especially the offspring of parents who don't put much effort into parenting and leave the babysitting and child rearing to 'devices'.
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  #115  
Old 01-09-2023, 07:49 PM
eyeflyer eyeflyer is offline
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[QUOTE=Sooner;4598602]Like at a lake, dad always laughed. The people on this side boat to the other side as the fishing has to be better there while passing the boats coming from the other side to fish where you just came from.

I fished walleye tournaments for about 25 years and I never minded going into an area where others were coming out of. We did really well some times doing just that, because maybe our speed was different, presentation was different what ever it was we did well. Also had the same thing happen to us as we were leaving or just left an area to see another boat go in and just slam them. Another big difference I see are boats with no sonar. we will be on the top or side of structure doing well and another boat will come in and anchor but not catch a thing. You can hear them saying change color, change bait etc, but the fact is with walleye especially on some structure if your as little as 20 feet off the "spot on the spot" you might as well be a mile............you are not catching anything.
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  #116  
Old 01-10-2023, 11:13 AM
Chowdowncowtown Chowdowncowtown is offline
 
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This is a temporary thing with regards to a lot of hunters in spots. Most of the hunters I know are older baby boomers who only have like 10 years of serious backcountry hunting left. If we want hunting to continue we need to get younger people into it IMO.
Oddly enough the biggest hurdle for me is finding someone willing to mentor me on hunting - it seems like a very difficult sport to get into as an adult if you weren't raised in a family of hunters or have close friends who hunt. After the hunter education courses, licensing, PAL etc. it's hard to know where to get started actually learning how to hunt.

You see something similar in rock climbing, which I've been doing for over a decade now - many older folks bemoaning how newer climbers are coming out to the rock without skills and knowledge, but when you ask how many newer climbers they've mentored personally, they don't have an answer. These days the majority of my time outdoors on rock involves guiding/teaching less experienced climbers to help them stay safe, which also reduces the risk of areas being restricted or closed to climbing due to accidents.
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  #117  
Old 01-10-2023, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Chowdowncowtown View Post
Oddly enough the biggest hurdle for me is finding someone willing to mentor me on hunting - it seems like a very difficult sport to get into as an adult if you weren't raised in a family of hunters or have close friends who hunt. After the hunter education courses, licensing, PAL etc. it's hard to know where to get started actually learning how to hunt.

You see something similar in rock climbing, which I've been doing for over a decade now - many older folks bemoaning how newer climbers are coming out to the rock without skills and knowledge, but when you ask how many newer climbers they've mentored personally, they don't have an answer. These days the majority of my time outdoors on rock involves guiding/teaching less experienced climbers to help them stay safe, which also reduces the risk of areas being restricted or closed to climbing due to accidents.
Keep socializing around here and your local range so you get to know other hunters. Strive to learn what you can on the style of hunting that interests you by asking questions

A lot of guys are reluctant to mentor someone until they get to know the person because they have had their fair share of bad hunting partners. A lot of experienced hunters invest a lot of time and effort into their hunting and a bad partner can ruin all your efforts
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  #118  
Old 01-10-2023, 12:05 PM
Chowdowncowtown Chowdowncowtown is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Smoky buck View Post
Keep socializing around here and your local range so you get to know other hunters. Strive to learn what you can on the style of hunting that interests you by asking questions

A lot of guys are reluctant to mentor someone until they get to know the person because they have had their fair share of bad hunting partners. A lot of experienced hunters invest a lot of time and effort into their hunting and a bad partner can ruin all your efforts
True enough, it would be a pretty big loss to spend a lot of time and effort creating an opportunity only to have it wrecked by a bad partner. Climbing is a little more forgiving in that sense, easy to see how people handle themselves in a lower-stakes scenario before doing anything committing.

Really for the first season or two what I want to focus on learning is the pre and post work, scouting, tracking, getting land access, camera placement, field dressing, butchering etc. Just going out and shooting an animal doesn't hold much appeal to me if I don't have the skills and knowledge to reproduce the result independently.
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  #119  
Old 01-10-2023, 01:00 PM
raab raab is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Chowdowncowtown View Post
True enough, it would be a pretty big loss to spend a lot of time and effort creating an opportunity only to have it wrecked by a bad partner. Climbing is a little more forgiving in that sense, easy to see how people handle themselves in a lower-stakes scenario before doing anything committing.

Really for the first season or two what I want to focus on learning is the pre and post work, scouting, tracking, getting land access, camera placement, field dressing, butchering etc. Just going out and shooting an animal doesn't hold much appeal to me if I don't have the skills and knowledge to reproduce the result independently.
Depends on what kind of hunting you want to do. If it was me I'd volunteer to tag along on a hunt to help with the field dressing and getting the meat out. I'd be leaving my rifle at home and trying to learn as much as possible.

Butchering is a whole other level, and you're probably going to want to have a butcher lined up to take your deer to.

I'd call your local AFGA association and see if they have anyone who'd be interested in teaching a new hunter. Or there's the hunting partner thread on here.
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  #120  
Old 01-10-2023, 01:09 PM
Chowdowncowtown Chowdowncowtown is offline
 
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Originally Posted by raab View Post
Depends on what kind of hunting you want to do. If it was me I'd volunteer to tag along on a hunt to help with the field dressing and getting the meat out. I'd be leaving my rifle at home and trying to learn as much as possible.
This was my approach as well, just having trouble getting any traction with it. Seems like most folks aren't interested in a tag-along who just wants to learn and pitch in with the grunt work, which I do understand to be honest.
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