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  #31  
Old 05-27-2020, 01:28 PM
Hoopi Hoopi is offline
 
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Default I agree with this

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Sky View Post
The Tikka stock is just fine. I'd keep it.
If the following upgrades have not been made to your T3, I'd do them.
1 Metal bolt shroud
2 Limbsaver recoil pad
3 Stainless steel recoil lug.
The above were changes that were made when Tikka introduced the T3X. They are not that expensive to do.

And now for that advice that you weren't asking for.

Hold off on the reloading. It's expensive to get into. If shooting becomes a hobby, you will probably want to get started with reloading. You can create ammo tailored to your firearm that is better than factory ammo. If you shoot a large volume of ammo, it can also be economical.

When shooting factory ammo, save your brass. Try to use just one brand of ammo. If you eventually decide to start reloading, you'll have a good amount of brass saved up. With brass running about a buck each, it is a fairly major expense when starting up. IMO, shooting factory ammo is not that expensive IF you are going to use the brass later for reloading purposes.

To become a good shot it is important to shoot. (duh!!) The more you can shoot, the better you will become. IMO, the best way to become a good shot is to get a rimfire. When you head out to practise with your 7mag, take a 22 along with you. Fire a box of 7mag and a couple boxes of 22. Shoot prone, offhand, kneeling, off of sticks, off your backpack, etc.

A better stock may improve the accuracy of your rifle, but I highly doubt that your Tikka stock will be inadequate for hunting. I'd wait before replacing the stock.
The improvement in your shooting that will happen from shooting that rimfire thousands of times will be much greater.

A rimfire is where I'd be putting any extra money that is burning a hole in my pocket.
This is good advice.
Hoopi
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  #32  
Old 05-27-2020, 01:29 PM
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Stinky Coyote Stinky Coyote is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckhead View Post
Oh good grief.

This is a new shooter. Trying to learn. How is he going to know how to test loads and components?
could not agree more, the last thing he needs to be chasing is another 1/4 moa, when he could be out working on his skills with the rifle, he already made a wise choice on the rifle, find the right factory ammo, invest in a couple cases of that ammo, and a way you go with the other upgrades

said he's a newer shooter looking to hunt elk deer and sheep, has a vx1 scope, wants to put some money into it in upgrades

to me this build screams for lightweight talley rings(2.5 oz), leupold vx3i 3.5-10x40 cds-zl (12.5 oz of awesomeness) and maybe that limbsaver recoil pad...if you've found the ammo it loves then invest in a couple cases of it as part of your upgrades

figure out your drop from 200 yard zero and order up the free matching zero lock turret and dial up anything you like to probably 700 yards, maybe invest in a good rangefinder if you haven't got one of those, you'll need it to take advantage of what that rifle can really do

and x2 on the rimfire advice, a regular savage mark whatever, plain jane sporter will shoot nearly as tight as an anschutz, mil-dot cheapish scope to play with your hold overs and practice lots with it, shooting sticks
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Last edited by Stinky Coyote; 05-27-2020 at 01:37 PM.
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  #33  
Old 05-27-2020, 01:39 PM
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58thecat 58thecat is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkhunter11 View Post
You learn by doing, there are many loads listed in the manuals and online, you try a combination of bullet/powder, and if the results aren't great, try another bullet, or another powder. Determining proper bullet seating depths and safe powder charges, takes a lot more learning, simply using components from a different container is easy.
and google your questions as there are forums out there in which the questions have been asked/answered and more than likely someone stumbled down the same road which will help you potentially get a pet load developed that your rifle likes quicker...
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  #34  
Old 05-27-2020, 01:41 PM
Buckhead Buckhead is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkhunter11 View Post
You learn by doing, there are many loads listed in the manuals and online, you try a combination of bullet/powder, and if the results aren't great, try another bullet, or another powder. Determining proper bullet seating depths and safe powder charges, takes a lot more learning, simply using components from a different container is easy.
And you are lecturing me on this because.....

Like I said in a previous post trigger time is the primary.

Until one gets that sorted, all the variables you mentioned are just a bunch of gobbledygook.

There is a learning curve involved and that starts with the rifle - not trying 900 different components.

Last edited by Buckhead; 05-27-2020 at 01:49 PM.
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  #35  
Old 05-27-2020, 01:50 PM
elkhunter11 elkhunter11 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckhead View Post
And you are lecturing me on this because.....
I am simply pointing out, that trying different components is easy, if you understand the basics . And if you don't understand the basics, any loading is risky. And testing more loads, means more trigger time, which is a good thing. The OP still hasn't clarified his goals in doing any upgrades though, and until he does, we can only speculate as to what he is trying to accomplish.
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  #36  
Old 05-27-2020, 01:55 PM
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58thecat 58thecat is offline
 
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Here we go...........

Another good point was buy a .22 and get out and shoot lots relatively cheap.
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  #37  
Old 05-27-2020, 01:58 PM
Buckhead Buckhead is offline
 
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Originally Posted by 58thecat View Post
Here we go...........

Another good point was buy a .22 and get out and shoot lots relatively cheap.
A T1X would be perfect. Same layout, same trigger. Put the same scope on it and there you go. Plink away.
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  #38  
Old 05-27-2020, 03:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckhead View Post
A T1X would be perfect. Same layout, same trigger. Put the same scope on it and there you go. Plink away.
now your talking....hope the OP is paying attention.
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  #39  
Old 05-27-2020, 08:35 PM
Gamblor Gamblor is offline
 
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Check out Wildcat Composite stocks, if swapping a stock is your thing.

Check out https://tikkaperformance.com/ if looking for some aftermarket replacement peices (shroud, bottom metal etc).

Talley Lightweights are a nice set of rings.

Reloading is sweet once you get it figured out and have some comfort with it, but it takes a bit of an investment of both money and time to get rolling with it.

Have fun with it, that's a sweet rifle in a great cartridge, good bang for your buck for sure.
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  #40  
Old 05-27-2020, 08:52 PM
MOAhunter MOAhunter is offline
 
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Best advice I've seen anyone give here is, "Leave it stock".
I'm sure it outshoots most people as it is and you never get much return on aftermarket parts anyways.
I would recommend doing nothing or selling and upgrading to Sako 85, S20 or Christian Arms Mesa.
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  #41  
Old 05-27-2020, 09:43 PM
KazIce KazIce is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinky Coyote View Post
even though they don't need it, for peace of mind and rock solid lock up of those action screws every time you take the stock off for a little tlc, you could have Henry Rempel pillar bed it, and have the barrel threaded with a thread protector for hunting and muzzle brake for the range work, his don't have poi shift and i've had several from him, and then make sure you're running talley rings, and upgrade the scope...

i did 7 lb all up tikka t3 lite stainless like this in .270 awhile back and shot factory ammo sub-moa all day long, made a believer out of a guy when called out for a 701 yard shot on a pretend sheep rock while afield and dialed up for perfect center hit, leupold ultralight 3-9x33 on that one with korth adding the 7/8" standard elevation target knob and Kenton supplying the speed dial turret corrected to 5000' and whatever temp i asked for at the time, likely close to 0 degrees c, we were probably at about 6000-6500' at the time...things were pretty quiet after that call out, factory federal fusion 130's to boot, those tikka's sure can shoot

you can make a heckuva sheep rifle out of that rig

for the scope upgrade i'd look real hard at the vx3i 3-9x40 with the new cds-zl turret for a perfect set up in talley low rings imo

Henry Rempel has done work for my father in law for eons. His T3 7mm Rem Mag was bedded, crowned and muzzle brake installed. Shoots insanely well, 1/2 inch MOA with Winchester super x. Has handloads for the rifle as well.

I bought a T3X 7mm RM last year. Nikon prostaff 4-12 scope on it. Hornady American Whitetail (Interlock) 154gr bullets and it barely shot 1 MOA. I wasnt happy. I had Mr. Rempel do the bedding, crown, and muzzle brake and now it shoots sub 1/2 MOA. Completely changed the rifle.

Bought the wife a T3X 7mm RM; took it to Henry before we even shot it. Waiting for some summer before we shoot it.

Your best return on investment for improving shooting accuracy will be taking it to Henry Rempel.

Im not handloading yet; I will be soon. Until then I keep saving that hornady brass. Reloading will unlock the next level of accuracy. Everybody is right about handloading as well; its just a significant higher amount of work to develop a load for your rifle. Plus investment in the equipment.


Just my 2 cents; tons of good advice to follow on this thread.


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  #42  
Old 05-28-2020, 07:42 AM
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Stinky Coyote Stinky Coyote is online now
 
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Lol...In Henry We Trust

If he gets hands on it, it will shoot.
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  #43  
Old 05-28-2020, 10:07 AM
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marky_mark marky_mark is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinky Coyote View Post
could not agree more, the last thing he needs to be chasing is another 1/4 moa, when he could be out working on his skills with the rifle, he already made a wise choice on the rifle, find the right factory ammo, invest in a couple cases of that ammo, and a way you go with the other upgrades

said he's a newer shooter looking to hunt elk deer and sheep, has a vx1 scope, wants to put some money into it in upgrades

to me this build screams for lightweight talley rings(2.5 oz), leupold vx3i 3.5-10x40 cds-zl (12.5 oz of awesomeness) and maybe that limbsaver recoil pad...if you've found the ammo it loves then invest in a couple cases of it as part of your upgrades

figure out your drop from 200 yard zero and order up the free matching zero lock turret and dial up anything you like to probably 700 yards, maybe invest in a good rangefinder if you haven't got one of those, you'll need it to take advantage of what that rifle can really do

and x2 on the rimfire advice, a regular savage mark whatever, plain jane sporter will shoot nearly as tight as an anschutz, mil-dot cheapish scope to play with your hold overs and practice lots with it, shooting sticks
Good advice here
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  #44  
Old 05-28-2020, 10:14 AM
elkhunter11 elkhunter11 is offline
 
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And still no clarification from the OP as to why he wants to modify his T-3. He may be looking for more accuracy, he may be looking for a more comfortable rifle to shoot, or he may just be one of those people that likes to personalize his belongings, but without clarification from him, all that we can do is speculate.
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  #45  
Old 05-31-2020, 05:54 PM
KP/-31 KP/-31 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckhead View Post
A T1X would be perfect. Same layout, same trigger. Put the same scope on it and there you go. Plink away.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MOAhunter View Post
Best advice I've seen anyone give here is, "Leave it stock".
I'm sure it outshoots most people as it is and you never get much return on aftermarket parts anyways.
I would recommend doing nothing or selling and upgrading to Sako 85, S20 or Christian Arms Mesa.
Bingo. Someone at Sako's R&D was using their head when they thought up the T1x concept. I've held one and it feels EXACTLY like my .223 Varmint SS.

I also agree you should leave it stock, maybe upgrade your scope, and get good at using it. The upgrades have no point if they don't make you a better shooter. My T3x .223 shot a three shot 1/2 moa group first time out of the box, and has touched 1/4 moa with Hornady and Nosler varmint bt's off the bench, but I doubt personally in a hunting situation I could do that with the adrenaline, etc. so I would agree more with the guys saying use factory ammo, unless you're shooting a lot or at VERY long range. Just my two bits. OP, might want to clarify your intent on the upgrades.
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  #46  
Old 06-01-2020, 09:17 AM
Osky Osky is offline
 
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I have a number of T3s between myself and sons and they are all shooters as is, they are actually better shooters than the people behind them Id that makes sense.
The only additions I have made to them is having Slimline muzzle brakes added. They are the same finish as the rifles, blend beautifully with the barrel, have not had any adverse effect on accuracy, and really soften up the recoil.

Osky
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  #47  
Old 06-01-2020, 10:43 AM
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Darrian Darrian is offline
 
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https://tikkaperformance.com/

These guys have it all and they send with your order free stickers!
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