Go Back   Alberta Outdoorsmen Forum > Main Category > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-09-2017, 07:28 PM
richardslc richardslc is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sherwood Park
Posts: 91
Default Wetsuit for cold weather.

Was just wondering if anyone's tried using a wetsuit to stay warm when sitting in a cold stand? They keep you quite warm while in the water so was just wondering if it would work good to keep you warm in the cold weather too. Seems to me like it might.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-09-2017, 07:33 PM
YYC338 YYC338 is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 204
Default

Some say 3mm divers/water sports neoprene socks with thin polypro liner socks are warmer than any thick wool sock you can slip in a boot
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-09-2017, 07:42 PM
RavYak's Avatar
RavYak RavYak is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: West Edmonton
Posts: 4,205
Default

Why not just use good winter gear? Problem with a wetsuit would be sweating then getting cold. Wetsuit works in water by keeping a thin layer of warm water against your skin. Dry it would just make you clammy and uncomfortable imo.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-09-2017, 07:44 PM
Albertadiver's Avatar
Albertadiver Albertadiver is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 8,633
Default

Wetsuits work with water to keep you warm with a thin layer of water that doesnít move between the neoprene and your skin.

Iíve sat on frozen lakes in a 7mm with farmer John two piece and stayed ok.

Keep in mind if you sweat you stay wet. The wetsuit boots once wet can stay REALLY cold if you sweat. When ice diving my boots freeze solid and we stand in a bucket of hot water to keep warm and get the boots off.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-09-2017, 07:51 PM
YYC338 YYC338 is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 204
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Albertadiver View Post
Wetsuits work with water to keep you warm with a thin layer of water that doesnít move between the neoprene and your skin.

Iíve sat on frozen lakes in a 7mm with farmer John two piece and stayed ok.

Keep in mind if you sweat you stay wet. The wetsuit boots once wet can stay REALLY cold if you sweat. When ice diving my boots freeze solid and we stand in a bucket of hot water to keep warm and get the boots off.
If your boots froze solid, how did your feet feel? The divers socks were discussed on a forum about winter hiking and climbing and many said they worked well. I've tried it this year and it's been warm in the boots although it hasn't been real cold yet.

They also say to spray your feet with unscented antiperspirant and I could see where that might help.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-09-2017, 08:02 PM
Albertadiver's Avatar
Albertadiver Albertadiver is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 8,633
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YYC338 View Post
If your boots froze solid, how did your feet feel? The divers socks were discussed on a forum about winter hiking and climbing and many said they worked well. I've tried it this year and it's been warm in the boots although it hasn't been real cold yet.

They also say to spray your feet with unscented antiperspirant and I could see where that might help.
The dry suit has a fairly thin Ďsockí which goes into a dive boot which is a lot like a regular hiking boot. If you put a running shoe in the water and then stand in the cold it isnít that pleasant.

If a guy used a nice neoprene bootie and kept your feet relatively dry i think it would keep your feet pretty warm. Biggest thing would be to keep from sweating.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-09-2017, 08:09 PM
richardslc richardslc is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sherwood Park
Posts: 91
Default

Don't think I'd sweat much just sitting in a stand. Especially with this cold weather.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-09-2017, 08:20 PM
Albertadiver's Avatar
Albertadiver Albertadiver is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 8,633
Default

https://www.xcelwetsuits-ca.com/coll...nt=30286538179

Something like that might do the trick. With neoprene snug is good, but too tight will restrict circulation.

Be interested to see how it works out!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-09-2017, 08:30 PM
RavYak's Avatar
RavYak RavYak is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: West Edmonton
Posts: 4,205
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by richardslc View Post
Don't think I'd sweat much just sitting in a stand. Especially with this cold weather.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
What about when walking to your stand? The slightest amount of exercise causes people to sweat. Most people also sweat when their skin is in contact with non breathable material such as neoprene(or a rain jacket etc).

Another thing you probably aren't thinking about is that when using a wetsuit in water the absolutely coldest temperature around you is 0 degrees and it is more likely the coldest you have experienced is probably closer to 5-10 degrees. Compare that to minus air temps and it quickly becomes apparent that standing outside in winter is much colder then in any water.

There is a reason that high end winter gear is built the way it is(multiple wicking layers) and it is the complete opposite of neoprene in that regard. If you are cold just buy better gear. With the right gear you could sit out there in -40 and still be warm and you won't have to worry about sweating and then freezing to death if you have to do something physical(truck breaks down etc).

Or don't listen to us, go try a wetsuit and then remember this thread when you are hating life lol.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-09-2017, 08:53 PM
Don_Parsons Don_Parsons is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 888
Default

I find venting is a good option, actually the whole over all package is the best.

The OP mentioned tree stand and staying warm.
Here is an idea that is on going even today.
More like a life long quest.

I've been adding to my all weather suit this year.

So for so good as its light, flexible, and warm in all configurations.

It's normally in the back-pack mode, Coat, coveralls, bibawack, tent, ground blind, or over night hang-out at the users choosing.

If it's raining or snow I turn it into a long coat.

It can be 1 of 1 or 1 of 3 depending on each situation.

About $140 Cnd funds.

Thin liner on the body, puffy liner over that to trap air, water proof liner, then cammo outer shell.
I added blue flex yoga mat material in 1" strips to all areas that will have contact on the ground.

Rear sections, hips, knees, elbows, shoulders.
That way there is padding and warm insulation between frozen ground and user,,, these strips are sew'en into small pillow squares that I can move around till I find the correct spots where they work best.

These pads fit under the camo gear up against the water proof liner.

Water tight zippers are soon to be added to the 10 venting areas,,, snap/ buckle cinch straps on the out side opening as back-up.

The suit is extra extra large, the straps tighten it up firm when walking in buck brush areas.

This is my 8th or 10th build over the years,,, this suit is the best to date since its super light, flexible and warm.
Venting is a must as it allows the material to breath so moisture can escape.

Many of us have done the clothing layer thing over the years, my original plan was to improve on this with less steps...
The idea came to me from telemark sking, mountain hiking, and off shore work,,, its by far the best adventure so far. Making improvements of models that are out there pushes my limits. I find it rewarding and challenging.

Friends and family have helped alot at getting this going, my sister has been the driving force behind this idea.

The main main plan behind this was to bring this to folks with no home or shelter. To weather life in the out-doors is hard,,, hopefully I can bring this to those in need.

I won't know this till I share it with others of like minded interests.

In the meantime I improve on this each year.
Wouldn't it be nice to walk into the bliss like a caveman or women going some where no where.

Animals tell us alot,,, purhaps us humans will have this option to push these limits into the wilds,,, innovation of ideas might take us there.

Just sharing an idea of what might or might not work.
Each of us choose what we're after. Taking advantage of this pushes the limits.

Don
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-09-2017, 09:07 PM
YYC338 YYC338 is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 204
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Albertadiver View Post
Biggest thing would be to keep from sweating.
That's what I was thinking too. I haven't done the antiperspirant thing yet, but may have to give it a try.

The sock I've used is 2.5mm, They don't recommend any thicker than 3mm, not sure why.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-09-2017, 09:59 PM
Don_Parsons Don_Parsons is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 888
Default

If you have cold boots in the winter after walking some distance, then sitting for a 1/2 to 1 hour, give these a try.

Not only will your feet be warm, the boots will to.

http://www.gostwear.com/baffin-cush-...SABEgL9hPD_BwE

I have the old school version of these in canvas camo siding with rudder buttons. There the best.

PS: Order them extra large so they can pull over the hunting boots.
Mine are size 15
Don
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-09-2017, 10:39 PM
mattthegorby mattthegorby is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 24
Default

As others have said wetsuits work by trapping water between the skin and suit and are not worn in frozen conditions. Even for paddlers a wetsuit is second choice to a waterproof breathable drysuit with long underwear and fleece pants underneath. This is about the same insulation level of you wearing goretex snow pants over fleece pants and long underwear.

Neoprene makes sense if your going to get wet, buy otherwise forget it. Insulation in dry conditions largely comes down to loft of the material and your neoprene is only 3mm - 5mm. Sure, neoprene socks have about the same loft as compressed wool socks and don't breath so it keeps heat... but that is not the case on the upper body when you could wear fleece, thinsulate, or down.

(been paddling, skiing and working in the mountains for over 20 years before moving to the city)

Sent from my SM-G920W8 using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-10-2017, 05:29 AM
calgarychef calgarychef is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,372
Default

God how I've played at staying warm..... A heater suit idea seems the best, I'm not particularly saying a heater suit brand but something similar. I made a huge "bunting bag" like you'd out a baby into only bigger. It works well over lighter clothing.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-10-2017, 05:30 AM
neilsledder's Avatar
neilsledder neilsledder is online now
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 906
Default

Does a wet suit have a fly? Might be hard to take a leak in the bush!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-10-2017, 07:30 AM
fish_e_o's Avatar
fish_e_o fish_e_o is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: rollyview
Posts: 7,537
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by neilsledder View Post
Does a wet suit have a fly? Might be hard to take a leak in the bush!
It would warm you right up
__________________
Savage barrel nuts
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-10-2017, 08:40 AM
Don_Parsons Don_Parsons is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 888
Default

Yes, a home purpose built suit is a way each of us can address what we're up against.

Back-pack mode I find is a wize option, if we don't need it during day it folds away small with the cinch straps and weighs next to nill.

My very first build was a long Mexican poncho, over the years it became 2 X's that size.

A few modification and it would remain as a poncho, coverals, or bibawack.

I've added, taken away, changed, improved, wrecked the process over the years.

So what's working.

Lite clothing body layer.
Big Puffy top and bottom that breaths, doesn't hold water or moisture, and space for air pockets with in the material.

The super light stretchy rain coat & pants go over this to trap the air space,,, the 10 vents get opened and closed threw out the day. If I go into ground blind mode it is buckled up tight top & bottom. The center section remain loose and puffy so I have room for my arms inside the suit to move if I choose.

About 1 minute to close up my boots in the suit,,, I call this the turtle mode. The blue pads insulate body heat loss on the frozen ground.

The layers can be changed out in many configurations,,, camo on the out-side at all times.

Another thing that's working is keeping it light,,, and adding the warmest puff cell material,,, these air pockets are a must.

Like I mentioned in the above post,,, the idea is on going and changing all the time... Even when I'm out on a trek.
Take notes of what's working and what is not.

One will know when we got it right.
Emergency space blankets can be fitted into the layers to,,, remember,,, venting is a must.

Hot coffee, and pure chocolate gets the human burner going. LOL.
Just like a wood stove.
About 20 minutes and you can't open the vent flaps fast enough. Ha.

I like to cool down to cold once I move to the next spot,,, adjust vents in route, then build up hot temps before landing... The total opposite of jet airplane engines.

Plan wize improves our outting.

Don
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-10-2017, 11:33 AM
Nester's Avatar
Nester Nester is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Innisfail
Posts: 1,996
Default

Think it's a horrible idea.


No way to vent sweat and you will end up a big wet frozen ball of despair.




https://www.mec.ca/en/explore/clothing-layers
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-10-2017, 06:45 PM
urcayuse's Avatar
urcayuse urcayuse is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 387
Default

Seals in all the juices.... hunting in a wet suit ? Iíve heard it all now. 🤨
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.