Your Optometrist in Edmonton

Go Back   Alberta Outdoorsmen Forum > Main Category > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-25-2011, 03:27 PM
timba's Avatar
timba timba is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Rainbow lake
Posts: 1,135
Default wood stove for a 12x16 cabin

I'm building a 12x16 hunting cabin this summer and was wondering what kind of wood stove to look for to heat it,I don't think it will have to be very big.I'm going to have 2x6 walls and well insulated.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-25-2011, 03:34 PM
eastcoast eastcoast is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 4,637
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by timba View Post
I'm building a 12x16 hunting cabin this summer and was wondering what kind of wood stove to look for to heat it,I don't think it will have to be very big.I'm going to have 2x6 walls and well insulated.
not too sure about the size of the stove itself,but a trick to remember that people seem to forget is to keep the chimney inside the cabin to the roof,I have seen people build very nice cabin's and run the chimney outsie from the back of the stove and it takes twice as much wood to heat it,alot of heat comes off a chimney especially if it's a metal one.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-25-2011, 03:35 PM
gramps73's Avatar
gramps73 gramps73 is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 4,178
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoast View Post
not too sure about the size of the stove itself,but a trick to remember that people seem to forget is to keep the chimney inside the cabin to the roof,I have seen people build very nice cabin's and run the chimney outsie from the back of the stove and it takes twice as much wood to heat it,alot of heat comes off a chimney especially if it's a metal one.
x2
the heat from the chimney is often over looked..
__________________
Avatar by Gitrdun
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-25-2011, 03:38 PM
flyguyd's Avatar
flyguyd flyguyd is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Southern Alberta
Posts: 2,806
Default

One of those wall tent stoves is probly all you need . It wont hold much heat but if your well insulated in that small space i would doubt you would need any thing more.I have a 10 x 24 cabin on my place in Sask and last spring when we were there it froze hard enough to have a inch of ice on the dog dish and it was very comfortable in there with nothing but body heat and breath.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-25-2011, 04:09 PM
dumoulin dumoulin is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,651
Default

I agree with every said so far. I would also add that it may be a good idea to put two 90 degree elbow to lengnthen the pipe inside the cabin as to further increase the radiating effect. If you ever get the chace to visit Princess Auto, they sometime have wood burning stoves. The store in Red Deer had realy nice ones built from much heavier metal than the ones used in guiding tents. They came with a metal rod rack on top to cook off of and 10" of chimney pipe too. They wanted 120.00$ I thougt it was a good deal...and they look nice too!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-25-2011, 04:35 PM
Sooner Sooner is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 2,909
Default

Dont buy a airtight, go with a nice small regular wood stove with a frt door. I would get one with glass so you get the nice fire look. If your going to spend time there it will be a nice touch. The flat top makes for a good heating surface, water, baked potatoes etc.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-25-2011, 04:48 PM
Grizzly Adams's Avatar
Grizzly Adams Grizzly Adams is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,270
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sooner View Post
Dont buy a airtight, go with a nice small regular wood stove with a frt door. I would get one with glass so you get the nice fire look. If your going to spend time there it will be a nice touch. The flat top makes for a good heating surface, water, baked potatoes etc.
x2. You don't need anything big or fancy. For about 500. you can buy a nice unit, on sale. Keep the insulated chimney to a minimum, cause that's what'll cost you. They used to make simple kits that suspended the chimney, from the ceiling, but I don't think they are available any more. you can get an insulated steel base to set it on, as well

Grizz
__________________
"Indeed, no human being has yet lived under conditions which, considering the prevailing climates of the past, can be regarded as normal."
John E. Pfeiffer The Emergence of Man
written in 1969
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-25-2011, 05:10 PM
jungleboy's Avatar
jungleboy jungleboy is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Stony Plain
Posts: 2,786
Default

Another option to the wood stove is the old diesel space heater they used to use in houses. I found one at a yard sale and we used it this year in the wall tent. It was excellent,and would run full out for about 14 hrs straight on 2 gallons of fuel. no power required and a lot less work than a wood stove .A bit more expensive to run but if your not heating all the time, it is a good alternative. The other thing we really liked with the oil heater was the consistent heat,not super hot and then freezing cold in the middle of the night.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_0109 - Copy.JPG (41.3 KB, 139 views)

Last edited by jungleboy; 01-25-2011 at 05:22 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-25-2011, 05:19 PM
Tuc's Avatar
Tuc Tuc is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,819
Default

There's a stove in the new Princess Auto flyer.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-25-2011, 05:25 PM
BEL BEL is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sylvan Lake
Posts: 886
Default cook stove

When we built our 14x16 insulated cabin I found a very used 1935 vintage cookstove which has worked very well for us. In the dead of winter I can get that cabin so warm you would have trouble sleeping at night. And of course we cook off it. BEL
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-25-2011, 06:14 PM
timba's Avatar
timba timba is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Rainbow lake
Posts: 1,135
Default

thanks guys you gave me some ideas what to look for.

timba
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-25-2011, 07:18 PM
Tundra Monkey's Avatar
Tundra Monkey Tundra Monkey is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Prosperous Lake, NT
Posts: 5,192
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dumoulin View Post
I would also add that it may be a good idea to put two 90 degree elbow to lengnthen the pipe inside the cabin as to further increase the radiating effect.
I would not do this as it will increase your creosote build up and it will make cleaning it a pain in the azz.....It's nice to climb up and push everything into the fire box for cleaning.

The cabin you describe will not take much to heat if it is built well.

tm
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-25-2011, 08:39 PM
canuck canuck is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: NW of Calgary
Posts: 303
Default

I've got a Pacific Energy airtight in my 16' x 24' cabin and it is way too much for the space - even a small fire overheats the place.
The only reason I put it in was I got it out of the Bargain Finder for a smokin deal. I'm also looking for something smaller and will move this stove to the new house I am building.

You can just barely see it in this pic

Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-25-2011, 09:22 PM
boonedocks boonedocks is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: in the pines
Posts: 501
Default

I put the smallest stove that I could find into my bunkhouse(12' x 12') and it is major overkill even on the coldest of nights.If memory serves me it is called the Maple Leaf(Fort Saskatchewan Canadian tire) I would go with a straight stove pipe for ease of cleaning and also recomend getting a glass door which this model does not have.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-25-2011, 10:39 PM
MacLeod's Avatar
MacLeod MacLeod is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: 'John Ware' Country
Posts: 5,283
Unhappy CO


Whatever is done, make sure the unit is intended for 'inside' use.

And make sure it's installed properly ... CO (carbon monoxide) KILLS!!!


TF
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-25-2011, 10:57 PM
chimpac chimpac is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 384
Default air for stove

If you are buiding your cabin fairly airtight the stove is going to need some air.
I would put in a screened vent bringing air from outside as near to the stove as you can.
I can show you how to make a stove out of a 5 gallon can that will have a baffle to make the cooktop hot, and stop sparks comming out the chimney.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-26-2011, 06:10 AM
timba's Avatar
timba timba is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Rainbow lake
Posts: 1,135
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chimpac View Post
If you are buiding your cabin fairly airtight the stove is going to need some air.
I would put in a screened vent bringing air from outside as near to the stove as you can.
I can show you how to make a stove out of a 5 gallon can that will have a baffle to make the cooktop hot, and stop sparks comming out the chimney.
what kind of vent should I look for?some thing like a dryer vent type?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-26-2011, 06:14 AM
timba's Avatar
timba timba is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Rainbow lake
Posts: 1,135
Default

this is what I was albe to find that was a smaller stove so far.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg stove.jpg (5.9 KB, 101 views)
File Type: jpg stove 1.jpg (4.4 KB, 94 views)
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-26-2011, 06:35 AM
Lonnie Lonnie is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,715
Default

a chimmey inside usauly draws better than on on the out side if you look at the old houses that used wood or coal for heat the chimmey was in the middle of the house out side chimmeys came when people started putting in fire places & wood burners more for decoration than practical use.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-26-2011, 06:41 AM
Lonnie Lonnie is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,715
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chimpac View Post
If you are buiding your cabin fairly airtight the stove is going to need some air.
I would put in a screened vent bringing air from outside as near to the stove as you can.
I can show you how to make a stove out of a 5 gallon can that will have a baffle to make the cooktop hot, and stop sparks comming out the chimney.
x2 on the air from out side for the heater. there is a good chance of having a lot of problems if your cabin is sealed up good and tight.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-26-2011, 07:19 AM
chimpac chimpac is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 384
Default vent

Quote:
Originally Posted by timba View Post
what kind of vent should I look for?some thing like a dryer vent type?
Just a screen, maybe heavier than regular window screen. The vent would supply air for combustion and also fresh dry air needed when you are drying stuff by the fire. An outlet vent is also needed for winter it should be 1/3 to 1/2 down from the ceiling. In summer a vent in the top of the room is nice to let hot air out.
A trap door in the floor over a hole in the ground is what the old timers used for a fridge.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-26-2011, 07:58 AM
Lonnie Lonnie is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,715
Default

if it was me I wood run a 1in. steel pipe from out side right into the stove that way the stove is not trying to get air out of the cabin to burn and know drafts coming in.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-26-2011, 08:04 AM
Double Shovel's Avatar
Double Shovel Double Shovel is offline
AO Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Cadogan
Posts: 1,019
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by timba View Post
this is what I was albe to find that was a smaller stove so far.
That is about the size I have in my 14 x 20 cabin
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-26-2011, 09:20 AM
j m's Avatar
j m j m is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 331
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TriggerFinger View Post

Whatever is done, make sure the unit is intended for 'inside' use.

And make sure it's installed properly ... CO (carbon monoxide) KILLS!!!


TF
X2 - Can't argue with that.
Alot of my buds went with propane units because they got a deal on the heating unit. That has spoiled me. Constant on is sweet compared to getting up in the night. I like wood heat as much as the next wood burner but would take the tradeoff of convinience over free fuel. Look for a litle heaters online& you will find something that suits you.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-26-2011, 11:54 AM
Sooner Sooner is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 2,909
Default

Crappy tire always has some small ones on sale, dont know how good quality they are. My friend heats a large garden shed with a wood stove and vents it from outside too.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 01-26-2011, 07:57 PM
BallCoeff.435 BallCoeff.435 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: God's Country
Posts: 751
Default

For a permanent (non-mobile) wood or dilute coal/wood mix heater, what you really, really want is a masonry heater or ridiculously heavy cast-iron one. (Or something similar, like a sealed steel stove embedded in masronry plates or bricks or water jacket.)

1.) You need something that will take fast, hot burns of wood and store the heat for gradual release over time. No smoldering fires choked down with some combination of dampers!

A small space gets overheated real quick with a hot fire, then gets cold fast after it burns down. If weight (mass) doesn't have to be towed around or broken down and packed, then it's your friend. Keep in mind though that anything in direct contact with a hot firebox, either a steel or firebrick one, has to be separated from that firebox by an expansion joint.

2.) You want an outside air feed so that warm inside air is not stolen by the stove just to feed the fire. Carbon monoxide protection is a nice plus too. Even an outside fuel and ash service would be good to cut down on mess.

3.) You want to keep the pipe straight up for best draft and easiest cleaning. Six-inch would be best.

4.) The pipe should NOT be considered a source of heat. Keep as much heat inside the pipe as possible (with an insulated pipe for example - even inside the building). That will avoid as many draft problems as possible, like fluttering flame jumping back into the room. Or like explosive fire-gas exuded from paper building up inside a cold stove at startup. You want the *difference* in temperature between the inside of the top of the chimney and the outside air to be as great as possible.

Stoves in a small room tend to be too hot anyway, you don't need even more of a problem from hot pipe metal.

It's different if you have a tent or big cabin or quonset hut with huge heat loss, equipped with a stove that's too small. In that case, you should just upgrade to a bigger stove and firebox, or several stoves, rather than trying to squeeze calories out of the pipe exhaust.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 01-26-2011, 08:22 PM
densa44 densa44 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: East of Stettler
Posts: 3,781
Smile Ball is right

I've had a stove like the one in the pictures. I used to heat a large uninsulated cottage in the winter with coal. It got so hot you couldn't stay inside! With the insulation you are talking about, very little heat will be required. Co is a much greater concern.

Have fun and be very careful about co and fire.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 01-26-2011, 11:02 PM
thefloormat thefloormat is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 342
Default

I looked at the princess auto stove, its very tiny. probably 1ft x2ft. the whole thing including the stove pipe comes in a box that one guy could carry. Id like to see one setup. I think it would be perfect for a smaller cabin. FOr $120 i thought about getting one and building a shed this summer, see if i could heat that place up and spend time out there in cold temps.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 01-28-2011, 07:58 PM
Northern Spirit Northern Spirit is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 33
Default Reply to Lonnie

One of the reasons fireplaces, wood heaters etc used to be centrally located in a house was for radiant heating purposes. With one source of heat , being centrally located, heat radiated outwards to the perimeter of the dwelling.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 01-28-2011, 09:41 PM
nimrod nimrod is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Alberta for the most part
Posts: 1,065
Default

You can get a wood burner for when you are awake time, but this might be another option, Orbis makes a direct vent furnace, NG or Propane, no power needed or add a fan kit, 12 volt or 120, we have one of these and it takes no space on the wall, stays on when we are sleeping,check it out this might be what you want. A pig tank for propane should last a year of heating in you small space, around 80 dollars to fill the tank, each spring for us.

http://www.asapheat.com/manual_english.pdf
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.